In The News

Rolex, Patek Philippe and rare pocket watches anchor Heritage Timepiece Auction

April 21st, 2010 by

DALLAS, TX – Name is everything when it comes to collecting high-end watches, which means that collectors will find plenty to pique their interests at Heritage Auction Galleries May 4-5 Signature® Fine Timepieces Auction, live at the company’s Dallas Design District Location, 1518 Slocum Street, and online, via Heritage LIVE!, at HA.com.

“Among the great names we’ve assembled in this auction standouts include Rolex, Patek Philippe, Martin Braun and Nashua, among the many,” said Jim Wolf, Director of Fine Timepieces at Heritage. “Smart collectors will also see that, with strategic bidding, they’ll be able to acquire some great examples at some very good prices.”

The anchor lot of the auction is a gorgeous Patek Philippe Very Fine Ref. 3970E Perpetual Calendar With Chronograph, Moon Phase, Leap Year & 24 Hour Indication, circa 2004, Case: No. 4010718, estimated at $95,000-$110,000, one of the more desirable models of more recent vintage from one of the world’s greatest names in horology.

“All the intricacy and craftsmanship that collectors have come to associate with the Patek Philippe name is on prominent display in this beautiful watch,” said Wolf. “The detail in the construction of this piece is truly amazing.”

A rare and important Nashua Watch Co. Gold American Pocket Watch, No. 1230, circa 1860, is estimated at $40,000-$50,000, and is expected to create a buzz among erudite collectors. This superb pocket watch is one of only four known 20-size key-wind pieces from this vital watchmaker.

“Since almost all of the production material made by Nashua from 1859 until its incorporation into the American Watch Co. in 1862 was left unfinished,” said Wolf, “a piece of this vintage is an incredible find, and would be an important part in any top collection.”

Collectors of pocket watches will have several more chances at superb examples if the Nashua watch escapes them when an extremely fine and massive Swiss 18K Rose Gold Minute Repeating Watch With Chronograph, Perpetual Calendar And Moon Phases Made For Beyer, Zurich, circa 1896, estimated at $35,000-$40,000, comes up for auction, with still more pocket watch glory available with a rare and very fine Patek Philippe & Cie Gold Trip Minute Repeater, Two Train Tandem Wind Pocket Watch, circa 1904, Case: No. 238126. The general consensus on this prime piece is that fewer than 30 examples are known. It is estimated at $35,000 – $45,000.

An important Henri Berthoud Gold United States Heroism Presentation Watch, Two Train With Diablotine & Split Seconds Chronograph, circa 1880, is estimated to at $25,000-$35,000.
“The exceptional condition and quality of this rare timepiece is evidence that it was a unique piece created for presentation by the United States Congress in recognition for a heroic act which required split second decision making,” said Wolf. “For reasons unknown, however, it has remained undedicated and was never inscribed to the intended recipient. If only we could find out who it was originally intended for the value would surely skyrocket.”

The top Rolex in the auction is rare Ref. 5512 Submariner, Underlined Four Line Gilt Dial, Pointed Crown Guard, Box & Papers, circa 1960s, estimated at $20,000-$30,000. This scarce early Submariner has the highly sought after pointed crown guard case and an exceptionally rare gilt lettered four line dial, underlined in silver below the Oyster Perpetual text.
Further highlights include, but are not limited to:

Patek Philippe Rare Keyless Lever Deck Watch With Power Reserve, Extra Quality Movement, circa 1911 Case: No. 273599: Estimate: $20,000 – $25,000.

Rolex Very Fine Ref. 1019 Milgauss Oyster Perpetual Wristwatch, circa 1980: Estimate: $18,000 – $24,000.

Martin Braun Unique Orion Chrono Royal Chronograph With Diamonds: Estimate: $25,000-$30,000.

Heritage Auctions, headed by Steve Ivy, Jim Halperin and Greg Rohan, is the world’s third largest auction house, with annual sales more than $600 million, and 500,000+ registered online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and gain access to a complete record of prices realized, along with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Century 20: Modern Design Auction – Palm Beach Modern Auctions

April 21st, 2010 by

Auction April 23rd – Catalog Now Online

Palm Beach Modern Auctions pays homage to Palm Beaches rich, stylish past with designs from:

Karl Springer, Edward Wormley, Angelo Mangiarotti, Phillip & Kelvin Laverne, Claude Conover,  Paavo Tinelle, Robert Wilson, Angelo Brotto, Pierro Fornasetti, K.E.M. Weber, Tommi Parzinger, Finn Juhl, Paul Evans,  Aloys Gangkofner, and more.

West Palm Beach, Fl.

Yogi Berra’s ’56 World Series pinstripes catch winning bid of $564,930 in Grey Flannel’s $2.1M Summer Games Auction

April 21st, 2010 by

Top lot in the auction: the New York Yankees pinstriped home uniform worn by Yogi Berra during the 1956 World Series perfect game pitched by Don Larsen, $564,930. Grey Flannel Auctions image.

WESTHAMPTON, N.Y. – One of the most widely identifiable of all professional sports uniforms – the pinstriped New York Yankees home uniform Yogi Berra wore during the 1956 World Series perfect game pitched by Don Larsen – has sold at auction for an astounding $564,930. The iconic uniform, which is prominently visible in a now-famous, copyrighted photo of Berra embracing Larsen after the final pitch of the perfect game, was purchased by a private collector.

Held in private hands for more than half a century, the sale’s top lot was consigned to Grey Flannel Auctions’ April 14 Summer Games Auction by a Florida man, Ronald Stevenot, who had been given the uniform to wear as a 17-year-old hopeful trying out for the Yankees’ rookie team in 1959.

“The minute I first held the uniform in my hands, I had a strong feeling it might be the one Yogi Berra wore during the ’56 World Series perfect game,” Grey Flannel’s president Richard E. Russek.

Russek took the uniform to Grey Flannel’s headquarters in New York, where he and his team of experts compared the uniform to a blowup of the famous World Series photo. To the naked eye, it was a convincing match, but further verification was required. The uniform was then painstakingly compared to DVD “stills” of the perfect game.

“Every Yankee pinstripe is like a fingerprint to when the jersey was worn,” Russek explained. “We compared the way the pinstripes matched up to the ‘N’ and ‘Y’ on the front, how they matched up to the collar and the sleeves, and it was an exact match. We then had our proof that it was unquestionably the uniform Berra wore as catcher during the 1956 World Series perfect game.”

1972 Roberto Clemente Pittsburgh Pirates game-used home jersey with team letter, $36,716. Grey Flannel Auctions image.

Other top baseball lots in the April 14 auction included a 1972 Roberto Clemente game-used Pittsburgh Pirates home jersey with team letter, $36,716; and an Ichiro Suzuki game-used and autographed bat from 2001, the year Suzuki was Rookie of the Year, American League MVP and batting titleholder for the season. It clinched a winning bid of $17,365

The coffee pot was working overtime during the 1,072-lot absentee, phone and Internet auction, which ran until 7:00 the following morning, when the books closed at $2,139,321.

1979 Dennis Johnson Seattle SuperSonics World Championship player’s ring with family LOA, $71,548. Grey Flannel Auctions image.

“The interest in game-used artifacts, uniforms and awards from all major sports – not just baseball – was tremendous,” said Russek. “Auctions are a highly accurate way of gauging which players and teams hold the public’s fascination. A case in point would be the late NBA superstar Dennis Johnson, who was a phenomenal player and, in the minds of many, greatly underrated. Everything in the sale that had a connection to Johnson went sky high.”

Johnson’s 1979 NBA/Sports Magazine Most Valuable Player Award from the World Championship Series was offered with a family letter of authenticity and scored a closing bid of $84,422 – more than 33 times its reserve. His 1979 Seattle SuperSonics World Championship player’s ring was bid to $71,548; while Johnson’s boxed 1986 Boston Celtics World Championship player’s ring was nothing but net at $44,427. Each of the rings came with a Johnson family LOA.

Circa-1986 Mark Messier Edmonton Oilers game-used jersey showing team repairs, $15,180. Grey Flannel Auctions image.

The hockey section of the sale was led by an authenticated circa-1986 Mark Messier game-used Edmonton Oilers jersey exhibiting team repairs. With an Oilers patch on the front and emblazoned with the number “11” and the NHL star’s name on its back, the orange, blue and white jersey made six times its reserve, finishing at $15,180.

A mid-1970s road jersey game-worn by legendary Dallas Cowboys quarterback Roger Staubach was another fan favorite, earning $13,800.

“We couldn’t be happier with the results of this auction,” said Russek. “Now it’s time to start the ball rolling for the August auction we’ll be conducting at the Basketball Hall of Fame. It’s an auction we produce every year during the weekend of the Hall of Fame Induction. It’s high energy and always a lot of fun.”

All prices quoted in this report are inclusive of 20% buyer’s premium. View the fully illustrated catalog with prices realized online at www.greyflannelauctions.com.

Contact Grey Flannel Auctions:

Tel. 631-288-7800, e-mail gfcsports@aol.com

#   #   #

About Grey Flannel Auctions:

A unique boutique auction house specializing in meticulously authenticated, game-used sports memorabilia, Grey Flannel Auctions caters to collectors, museums and other institutions that seek high-end acquisitions with impeccable provenance. Grey Flannel Auctions is the official appraiser and authenticator for the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association and NFL Alumni. Sotheby’s chose Grey Flannel to authenticate the largest and most important baseball uniform collection ever to come to auction – the Barry Halper collection.

Litchfield County Auctions – Connecticut’s Premiere Estate Auction Gallery

April 20th, 2010 by

Auction features over 900 lots of fresh on the market estate property

Preview party April 22

Gallery Viewing & Tag Sale April 23rd – April 27th

Free Appraisal Day April 24th

Auction Ends April 24th

Bonhams & Butterfields – Prints – May 4th, 2010

April 20th, 2010 by

Bonhams & Butterfields

Catalog Now Online

Fine Prints

May 4th, 2010

Bonhams – Photographs – May 18th, 2010

April 20th, 2010 by

Catalog Now Online

Bonhams

New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles

Phillips de Pury & Company – Design – London

April 19th, 2010 by

London Design

Catalogue Available Online

Auction April 28th, 2010

Elvgren, Vargas, Petty and other Pin-Up luminaries head to Beverly Hills for $3,000,000+ Heritage Auctio

April 19th, 2010 by

The greatest pin-up paintings of the epic Martignette Estate will be offered in a special May 7 Heritage Beverly Hills Pin-Up and Glamour Illustration Art auction.

BEVERLY HILLS – If ever there was a perfect match, it would be the setting of the Golden State with a showing of the greatest names in Pin-Up and Glamour Art, and now they’ve set a date to make beautiful music together at Heritage Auction Galleries Beverly Hills on May 7, 2010 for the company’s Signature® Illustration Art Auction, in-person at 9478 West Olympic Blvd, and online at HA.com.

“The top names in Glamour and Pin-Up – Elvgren, Vargas, Petty, Armstrong, Bolles, Moran – are all here in this superb collection,” said Ed Jaster, Vice President of Heritage Auctions. “Los Angeles is celebrated for its beautiful women, but even so, the city is in for a fun, glitzy floor show with these ladies.”

The Illustration Art venue at Heritage has grown increasingly popular throughout the last 10 months, with the three auctions that have transpired since the company began auctioning the epic Charles Martignette Estate last July. Many of the best examples are waiting their turn at auction, and for several of Martignette’s personal favorites, that turn is coming up in Beverly Hills in only a few weeks.

Perhaps the most significant piece of Pin-Up art in the auction, and certainly one of the most famous pieces of pin-up art ever painted, is Gil Elvgren’s 1962 masterpiece Bear Facts (A Modest Look; Bearback Rider), estimated at $50,000-$75,000.

“The pin-up talent most near and dear to Martignette’s heart had to be Gil Elvgren, and his favorite piece was Bear Facts,” said Todd Hignite, Consignment Director at Heritage Auctions. “It was showcased as the dust jacket cover, and featured again as figure 414, of the important monograph, Gil Elvgren All His Glamorous American Pin-Ups by Martignette and Louis K. Meisel, and once again as figure 382 of The Great American Pin-Up, also written by Martignette and Meisel. Here is a pin-up masterwork that top collectors have been waiting years to have a chance at owning.”

Martignette was also a passionate fan of the radiant hues, sweeping rhythms, and enchanting detail featured in the pastels of the legendary Rolf Armstrong, all of which are on full display in the artist’s 1947 drawing for the calendar print Twinkle Toes, one of the most iconic pin-ups in the Martignette Estate, estimated at $20,000-$30,000.

“For those who know illustration, drawings don’t get much better than this piece,” said Jaster. “All of Armstrong’s bravura draftsmanship is evident in this incredible piece, perhaps more so than any other that he created.  Martignette knew what this piece was worth, and I’m betting that today’s collectors also know its value, and are willing to bid whatever it takes to win.”

In keeping with the theme of Martignette’s favorites, Heritage is also offering Coles Phillips’ 1922 Holeproof Hosiery Company ad illustration, one of the earliest and most popular of all American pin-up pieces. This lovely ad illustration appeared in Life, Redbook, Library Digest, Good Housekeeping, Pictorial Review, and Women’s Home Companion magazines in 1922-23, and it was reproduced in the books,  All American Girl — The Art of Coles Phillips by Michael Schau, Famous American Illustrators by Arpi Ermoyan, and  Martignette and Meisel’s own seminal book, The Great American Pin-Up. It is estimated at $18,000 – $24,000.

While Martignette was identified almost exclusively with the big-name illustrators whose art he saved and championed, his incredible eye for often unheralded, yet important works, must also be noted, and credited. He single-handedly saved many superb mid-20th Century American illustrations from a fate that might otherwise have been measured only in obscurity. Such is the case with George Hughes’ classic Aug. 28, 1954 Saturday Evening Post cover, a painting that, in acquisition, confirmed not only Martignette’s eye for great paintings of ladies, but also his ability to identify a compelling story, and a classic piece of Americana. It is estimated at $8,000 – $12,000.

“In addition to the Martignette Pin-Up and Glamour Art treasures that anchor this auction,” said Hignite, “we’ll offer a sparkling selection of highlights from his collection of the biggest names in Illustration, just as the Heritage clients have come to expect.”

Among the important examples of the form that will be auctioned in Beverly Hills are  J. C. Leyendecker’s 1920 House of Kuppenheimer ad illustration Record Time, Cool Summer Comfort, estimated at $20,000 – $30,000, and Norman Rockwell’s c. 1960 Portrait of a Woman in a Red Dress (Mrs. David Shapiro), an important piece in the Rockwell oeuvre that was a product of the artist’s  1960 joining of Best on Thursday mornings, a group of artists that met in the Pine Street, Cambridge, MA studio of Peggy Worthington. It is estimated at $8,000-$12,000.

According to Rockwell historian Laurie Norton Moffatt, “The purpose of the class was for him to experiment in loosening up his tight, detailed style in which he felt he had become too rigid.” She has further noted, “Some of the portraits were sold in a gallery shop at the studio. Many were given to the models who had posed during the session. The remaining paintings are part of the Norman Rockwell Paintings Trust at the Old Corner House.”

While the Martignette lots will be an undeniable draw in the May 7 auction, avid collectors of Science Fiction/Fantasy art have already sat up and taken notice of the inclusion of The Frank Collection of Science-Fiction and Fantasy Art, perhaps the most awesome assemblage of Fantasy art ever offered.

Chief among the amazing rarities in The Frank Collection is Frank Frazetta’s Warrior with Ball and Chain, Flashing Swords #1, paperback cover, 1973, one of the most-recognizable and famous of all Sword and Sorcery Fantasy paintings. It is estimated at $200,000-$300,000.

“This stirring, savage and superb Frazetta masterwork first appeared on the cover of the anthology Flashing Swords #1, published by Dell in the early 1970s,” said Jaster, “and it’s only gained in popularity since then. Such a peak-period, published cover painting spotlighting the signature subject matter by the master represents an incredible collecting opportunity.”

Science Fiction masterworks from The Frank Collection take the stellar form of Chesley Bonestell’s Saturn Viewed from Titan, c. 1952, the most famous and recognized image Bonestell ever painted, estimated at $30,000-$50,000, and in Virgil Finlay’s Palos of the Dog Star Pack, Famous Fantastic Mysteries cover, October 1941, another of Science Fiction’s most intriguing and beloved images. It is estimated at $8,000-$12,000.
An exhilarating opportunity for erudite collectors comes to auction from The Mort Künstler Collection, selections from the personal archives of the legendary post-war men’s adventure magazines’ premier artist.  Among its offerings will be Captured by the Chief, Stag cover, February 1967, estimated at $4,000-$6,000, Blonde on the Rocks, Men cover, August 1967, a classic of the form, for which Künstler set the standard, which is estimated at $3,000-$4,000.

Heritage Auctions, headed by Steve Ivy, Jim Halperin and Greg Rohan, is the world’s third largest auction house, with annual sales more than $600 million, and 500,000+ registered online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and gain access to a complete record of prices realized, along with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers – Fine Furniture and Decorative Arts

April 19th, 2010 by

Catalogue Now Online

Preview April 28th – May 1st

Auction May 2nd – Mat 4th 12pm

Chicago, Illinois

Dazzling diamonds, designer jewels and famous names highlight Heritage May Jewelry auction

April 19th, 2010 by

Selections from The Dorothy & Sidney Factor Collection; also Cipullo, Cartier, Tiffany, Harry Winston, Van Cleef & Arpels and more, May 3 in Dallas

DALLAS, TX — A fantastic collection of jewels by some of the most prolific and highly sought after jewelers and jewelry firms on the planet will have the eyes of collectors of brilliant gems and precious metals firmly fixed on Dallas on Monday, May 3, when Heritage Auction Galleries presents its Signature® Fine Jewelry Auction live at the company’s Dallas Design District showroom, 1518 Slocum Street, and online at HA.com.

“The selections in this auction run from the Venerable – names like Cartier, Tiffany, Van Cleef & Arpels and Harry Winston,” said Jill Burgum, Director of Jewelry Auctions at Heritage, “to the artistic and contemporary, with names like Aldo Cipullo, David Webb, Marco Bicego and Donna Vock constituting just a few of the designers in the sale.”

Above all, however, what stands out in this auction are the diamonds with a dazzling array awaiting erudite bidders. The first among equals is the gorgeous pear-shaped 13.75 carat Diamond and Platinum Ring from the Dorothy & Sidney Factor Collection, being sold by the famous Beverly Hills family to benefit charity. It is estimated at $125,000-$175,000.

“You’ll be hard pressed to find a more elegant or eye-catching diamond,” said Burgum. “It was a gift from Sidney to Dorothy during the latter part of their legendary marriage, and has always been one of Dorothy’s favorite pieces. She’s parting with it now to let someone else enjoy its magnificence, as well as to act as a fundraiser for the family’s favorite charities.”

Another Diamond, Platinum Ring, this one from Tiffany & Co., featuring s 5.60 carat Lucida™-cut diamond, is also expected to turn heads. The Lucida™-cut from Tiffany is one of the company’s most popular cuts, introduced in 1999, and was the result of decades of development by the famed company. The elegant cut features elements of the Asscher and antique cushion-cuts melded into what is considered a more contemporary diamond cut. It features a modified square cut with truncated corners, a high step-cut crown, a small table and brilliant faceted pavilion – making for 50 total facets. It is estimated at $100,000-$125,000.

Also of considerable note to collectors is a Fancy Colored Diamond, Diamond, White Gold Ring featuring a Grayish Yellowish Green oval-shaped diamond weighing 7.84 carats, enhanced by round brilliant-cut diamonds weighing a total of approximately 3.00 carats, set in 18k white gold. It is estimated at $75,000 – $100,000.

A Fancy Green Diamond, Pink Diamond, Platinum, Gold Ring from designer David Alan, featuring a natural Grayish Yellowish Green radiant-cut diamond weighing 5.55 carats, estimated at $60,000-$80,000, is expected to bring some competitive bidding, while a simple yet stunning Diamond, Platinum Ring, weighing 4.07 carats, flanked by baguette-cut diamonds and set in platinum, is expected to bring $40,000-$50,000.

Of particular note in the designer jewelry selections is a grouping of four gorgeous and colorful designs from legendary Cartier designer Aldo Cipullo, one of the only craftsmen that Cartier let sign his pieces while he was in their employ.

“Cipullo invented the LOVE bracelet, which is just as popular today as it was 30 some years ago,” said Burgum. “His designs are timeless. Owning a Cipullo piece is an art experience.”

Roman-born Aldo Cipullo, the son of a prominent Italian jeweler, immigrated to New York in 1959 at age 23, where he studied at Manhattan’s famed School of Visual Arts. It was while working for David Webb, Tiffany and Cartier that he showcased his talent for innovative design. Cipullo’s passion for modern living influenced his pure, clean designs. The mass appeal of his designs was evident in the tremendous interest expressed in both the press and the public, as well as by socialites and celebrities alike. Some of his most well-known clients included Sophia Loren, Liza Minnelli, Elizabeth Taylor, and the Duchess of Windsor, as well as Pierre Cardin, Frank Sinatra and Richard Burton.

“In 1974, the same year he opened his own business – Aldo Cipullo, Ltd. – he won the prestigious Coty Award for his pioneering influence on the design of men’s jewelry,” said Burgum. “Ten years later, on February 2, 1984, Cipullo died much too early, at age 48, in New York City.”

Further highlights include, but are not limited to:

Bvlgari Fancy Yellow Diamond, Platinum, Gold Ring: Featuring two Fancy Yellow triangular-shaped diamonds, one weighing 2.12 carats together with one weighing 1.64 carats, flush set in platinum and 18k yellow gold, accompanied by its original signed box. Marked Bvlgari. Estimate: $35,000 – $45,000.

Diamond, Platinum Ring: Featuring a cushion-shaped diamond weighing approximately 4.45 carats, flanked by cut-cornered shield-cut diamonds, set in platinum. Estimate: $30,000 – $40,000.

Diamond, Platinum Ring: Featuring a round brilliant-cut diamond weighing 4.07 carats, enhanced by baguette and square-cut diamonds, set in platinum. Total diamond weight is approximately 5.65 carats. Estimate: $30,000 – $40,000.

Diamond, Platinum, White Gold Necklace: Featuring a kite-shaped diamond weighing 4.05 carats, enhanced by a full-cut diamond weighing approximately 0.45 carat, set in platinum, suspended by 18k white gold chain. Estimate: $30,000 – $40,000.

Diamond, Platinum Bracelet: From the Dorothy & Sidney Factor Collection. The bracelet features 38 pear-shaped diamonds of varying weights, enhanced by baguette-cut diamonds, set in platinum. Total diamond weight for the bracelet is approximately 32.50 carats. Estimate: $25,000 – $50,000.

Heritage Auctions, headed by Steve Ivy, Jim Halperin and Greg Rohan, is the world’s third largest auction house, with annual sales more than $600 million, and 500,000+ registered online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and gain access to a complete record of prices realized, along with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.