Upcoming Show Information

New York Photo Show

November 29th, 2011 by

Antique, Modern, Digital, and Vintage Photography the most diverse show of photographs.

For more info visit:

http://usphotoshows.com

USA Theatres to host new antique toy and coin-op show

November 23rd, 2011 by

HERSHEY, Pa – USA Theatres, which operates drive-in and outdoor theatres in Central Pennsylvania, is entering into the world of antique toys by launching the American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show.

According to the company, the show will feature quality exhibitors buying, selling and trading a wide array of antique and collectible toys, including tin, cast iron, mechanical, pressed steel, banks, advertising, holiday, Marx, soldiers, coin-ops, and more.

“Since outdoor movies are a seasonal business, trade shows and conventions have become an important part of our annual programming,” said Ronald M. Vastola, Outreach Coordinator of USA Theatres.  “The show will be promoted and marketed through various media outlets, including television, Internet websites, daily and weekly newspapers, trade papers, and direct market mailers and magazines.”

A previous show organized by USA Theatres was the Baltimore Non-Sports Card Convention, which featured numerous exhibitors from the non-sports hobby, including artists, authors, manufacturers, publishers, and dealers.

The American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show is set to debut for the general public on Saturday, March 3, 2012, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Eastern Civic Center, situated within walking distance from the Metro-North Train Station in Old Greenwich, Connecticut.

General admission into the event is $10 for adults and free for children under 12.  Early buyers are welcome Friday evening at 6:00 p.m. and also Saturday morning at 7:00 a.m. for $20 per person each day.

A variety of food and beverages will be available for purchase at the show, provided by Joemomma Foods Incorporated of Hershey, Pennsylvania, according to the show’s promoter, USA Theatres.

“It’s going to be a brisk and fantastic show,” Vastola said.

 

Want to exhibit?

8 ft. by 8 ft. exhibitor spaces are currently available for $150 each and include one 8 ft. table, two chairs, and two exhibitor badges; while 16 ft. by 8 ft. spaces are available for $250 each, and 24 ft. by 8 ft. spaces are available for $350 each.

For more information, call (717) 542-0567 or email usatheatres@yahoo.com

You may also visit the website, www.usatheatres.com/conventions.html

Another Miracle at the Marburger Farm Antique Show in Round Top, Texas

October 10th, 2011 by

10.10.11 Round Top, TX— Marburger Farm has done it again. The twice yearly mega-show in Round Top, Texas has overcome hurricanes, wars, recessions and more. This Sept. 27–Oct. 1, the prospects included all of those, plus the tail end of the driest, hottest Texas summer in decades. But the not-so-little show that could pulled off a winner again.

 

After two hot days, about noon on Thursday, a clap of thunder sounded. “In our tent,” said Patrick Kenny of upstate NY’s South Porch Antiques, “with each clap of thunder, people clapped back. When the rain started to pour, they cheered and yehawed, as only Texans can yehaw. At Brimfield, we cried over rain. At Marburger Farm, they were cheering in the aisles.”

 

As the rain continued, someone turned up the volume on “Amazing Grace” and shoppers found that the 10 football field size tents and 12 historic buildings on Marburger’s 43 acre site provided perfect cover for shopping over 350 exhibitors from 38 states and several nations. Kenny sold gilded frames, a pair of nine-foot tall glass doors from an 1890 Pennsylvania building and a three foot wide mirrored ballroom ceiling disc from a 1920s Catskill resort. Like many antiques sold at Marburger Farm, that piece will travel further west to a Seattle shop.

 

West coast wholesale buyers dominated the opening days. ”In spite of the heat early on, the designers and store buyers were here,” said Julie Harris of Kansas City, MO. “The first two days were strong selling days for me.” Harris sold, antique trunks and silver sporting trophies, many of them going west.

 

Most exhibitors reported good to utterly outstanding sales, with many setting career records. “Our closing day on Saturday, was the highest we’ve ever had,” said Rhonda Holden of 2 Girl’s Stuff from Dallas. Holden sold six rugs, Spanish Colonial iron and antique bottles topped with industrial gauges for use as bookends and sculpture.

 

Another Texas dealer, Ray Veazey of San Antonio, had shoppers fighting over a French canopy bed and huge metal leaves from a 1980s Neiman Marcus display by Emilia Castillo. “Of the 29 Marburger shows that we have done,” said Veazey, “this was our top 3rd in gross sales. The shoppers who come to Marburger Farm are real troopers. I’m really thankful that they came.”

 

Studio F’s Kara Fogertey of St. Louis MO and Mike Whittemore of Punta Gorda, FL had their best show ever. They sold eight mirrors, eight pieces of upholstered furniture, an 18th c. carved English bookcase and every zinc-topped table they brought. “We save stuff for six months just for Marburger,” said Whittemore. “and then we price things right for the market. Instead of getting that extra 10-20%, we do it in volume at Marburger Farm.”

 

Danny Martin of L’Antiquario Antique Tiles from Miami Beach, FL reflected, “In spite of everything, it was one of the best shows we’ve ever had anywhere—really up there.” Martin sold a large trumeau fireplace surround with faux marbling, a French leather tri-fold door to be used as a headboard and thousands of reclaimed antique floor tiles from European buildings. Colleen Martin reported that “Some people were into architecturals because they are renovating and others because the building market is coming back. We have about 30 homes to follow up with antique tiles because of this show. Marburger Farm did not disappoint.”

 

First-time Marburger exhibitor John Tuttle of Atlanta’s ReWorks summed it up: “Everything I had ever heard about Marburger Farm was true. There is more great merchandise and more talent at Marburger Farm than at any show I have ever seen.” Tuttle brought talent in tow by creating 150 lamps from re-purposed antiques such as old boot forms, hubcaps, musical instruments and architectural fragments. “Just one store buyer bought 18, another bought 14, all going to NM, AZ, CA and other western states.”

 

“Marburger Farm has evolved into a national and international crossroads for antiques and for talent,” says show co-owner Rick McConn. “We had our highest international and national attendance. One shopper kept texting photos of merchandise at the show to a niece in Hope, AR. A text returned: ‘Where is the nearest airport?’ With a private plane and a local airport, she was here shopping that very afternoon. And she fit it all into the plane, except for two carved eagles that had to be shipped. Hope springs eternal.”

 

Co-owner Ashley Ferguson believes that one reason this show was so compelling for shoppers was the introduction of a special contract requiring all merchandise to be antique, vintage pre-1989 or re-purposed from antique pieces. “You don’t have to paw through piles of reproductions at Marburger Farm,” says Ferguson. “We had the show vetted by an appraiser from the “Antiques Roadshow” and he pronounced us ‘a clean show.’ Marburger dealers search all over the world for the antique, vintage and re-purposed pieces that bring authenticity into a home—and that makes a difference.”

 

The show also made a difference by hosting a benefit booth for the Houston affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure, as well as for the Brookwood Community, a Texas non-profit group that empowers adults with special needs. Additionally, a portion of the show’s ticket proceeds benefited Susan G. Komen-Houston to help in the fight against breast cancer.

 

A similar survivor spirit is one reason that Marburger Farm thrives: Texas shoppers are resilient. Exhibitor Beverly Williams of Warren, TX sold a French cupboard to a woman from Bastrop, TX, scene of recent fires that destroyed over 400 homes. “With her,” reports Williams, “were two other women from Bastrop, all next-door neighbors and all had lost their homes in the fire. Here they were at Marburger Farm, shopping to rebuild and to replace antiques that had been handed down in their families. They bought all over the show and I sent them all home with gifts from my booth. It touched my heart to see their spirit.”

 

In that spirit, the Marburger Farm Antique Show invites you, wherever you live, to the April 3-7, 2012 show, deep in the heart of Texas— where the bluebonnets are pretty darn resilient too.

 

The Spring Marburger Farm Antique Show opens Tuesday April 3 for Early Buying Admission from 10 am until 2 pm. Regular admission begins at 2 pm until 5 pm that day. Admission is good all week and parking is free. Shopping continues on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 am until 5 pm and on Saturday, April 7, from 9 am until 4 pm. For maps, photos, the show blog and information on tickets, groups, the Marburger Café, on-site shipping and special events, see www.roundtop-marburger.com

New York’s Salmagundi Club announces details of October art auction series

September 28th, 2011 by

Kim Muller-Thym, 'Cloudy Creek,' oil, 9 x 12 in., estimate $1,200. Image courtesy of Salmagundi Club.

NEW YORK – New York City’s revered Salmagundi Club – an artists’ organization founded in 1871 – is planning a major fundraiser during the month of October that comprises three auctions of juried artworks submitted by its artist-members. The auctions will be held at the Salmagundi Club on Friday, Oct. 14 at 8 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 23 at 2 p.m. (following a brunch in the dining room), and Friday Oct. 28 at 8 p.m. As a special incentive, no buyer’s premium will be payable on any artwork purchased, and to accommodate those who cannot attend in person, there will be Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

“Over the years, collectors have flocked to our semiannual auction fundraisers to buy top-quality artworks from some of America’s finest artists, often at very attractive prices,” said Salmagundi Club President Claudia Seymour. “When we included Internet live bidding at our March auction, it opened a new bidding avenue for art lovers around the world and resulted in some lively battles over premier artworks. We expect to see exciting competition in the October auctions, as well.”

 

All painting media will be represented in the October auctions, including oils on canvas, acrylics on canvas, etchings, watercolors, sculptures, pastels under glass and lithographs, some of them hand colored. Additionally, there will be original drawings, pen-and-ink works and photographs. Most of the two-dimensional works are framed, while a few are gallery-wrapped with canvas.

 

Anne Kullaf, 'Daydreams on 14th Street, oil, 20 x 20 in., estimate $1,500. Image courtesy of Salmagundi Club.

“We have many outstanding, well-known artists on our membership roster, and the quality of what is offered in our

upcoming auctions is quite exceptional. Our board is committed to maintaining a high level with our auctions, and that includes introducing bidders to the work of talented emerging artists, as well,” said Seymour.

 

In the past, Salmagundi Club auctions have operated under a fixed, flat-rate structure whereby nearly all artworks opened at $300, sculptures at $300-$400, and photos or multiple impressions at $150.

 

“We have done away with that method, now. We don’t want low opening prices to discourage better-known and more-accomplished artists, who get good prices in galleries, from putting their work in our sales,” said Seymour. “Our new policy is to ask the artist for a reasonable, typical price on an artwork they wish to submit, and we’ll open it at 30% of that price.”

 

Seymour explained how the artworks are selected for inclusion in the auctions. “Each artist-member may submit up to three pieces for consideration. Our art committee juries the art and selects those pieces that we believe have both the highest artistic merit and the greatest likelihood of selling. If three artworks from a particular artist are chosen, each will go into a different sale so they aren’t competing against each other,” Seymour said.

 

John Traynor, 'Jeffersonville, Vermont,' oil, 9 x 12 in. Image courtesy of Salmagundi Club.

Proceeds from the auctioned artworks are divided evenly between the artists and the club. “Normally, if an artist sells a work through one of our exhibitions, they receive 70% and the club receives 30%, but because the fall auction series is our principal fundraiser, our artist-members have graciously agreed to a 50/50 split,” Seymour said.

 

Beginning on Monday, Oct. 3, all artworks entered in the fall auction series will be displayed in a public exhibition at the Salmagundi Club. On Thursday, Oct. 6, the club will host a reception from 6-8 p.m. that includes the presentation of awards to the exhibition’s prizewinners.

 

Exhibition hours are Monday through Friday from 1-6 p.m., and weekends from 1-5 p.m. Auction dates and times are Friday, Oct. 14 commencing at 8 p.m.; Sunday, Oct. 23 at 2 p.m. (following a brunch from 11 a.m. till 3 p.m. in the club’s dining room); and Friday Oct. 28 starting at 8 p.m. All events, including the brunch and reception, are open to the public. The Salmagundi Club is located at 47 Fifth Avenue between 11th and 12th Streets in Manhattan.

 

For additional information about the auction, call 212-255-7740 or e-mail info@salmagundi.org. Visit the club’s website at www.salmagundi.org.

 

Online catalogs for the three October auctions may be viewed online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com, where prospective bidders may also sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet. Absentee bidding will also be available via written bidding forms at the preview.

 

About the Salmagundi Club:

 

Steeped in history, the Salmagundi Club is one of the oldest art associations in the United States. Since 1917, it has been headquartered in what is now the only remaining brownstone on Fifth Avenue, directly across from the First Presbyterian Church. Its roster of past members includes such fine-art luminaries as Thomas Moran, William Merritt Chase, Louis Comfort Tiffany, N.C. Wyeth and Childe Hassam. Of its 850 currently active members, more than 600 are artists.

 

The club’s activities include art classes, exhibitions, painting demonstrations and both fundraising and social events. The nonprofit Salmagundi Club owns a collection of more than 1,500 works of art spanning its 140-year history.

Arbor Antiques Show at Round Top

September 22nd, 2011 by

featuring: Jim Lord, Hill Country Designer and Artist Mary Baldwin

Sotheby’s – Derbyshire UK – Beyond Limits – Sotheby’s ay Chatsworth: A Selling Exhibition

September 21st, 2011 by

Sotheby’s annual selling exhibition of monumental sculpture returns to Chatsworth for its sixth installment this autumn, with an extraordinary line up of artists, many of whom have never been shown at this magnificent location in the Peak District before. It runs from September 16th to October 30th.

Arbor Antiques Services – Round Top Antiques & Collectibles Shows – Sept. 23rd – Oct. 1st

September 21st, 2011 by

Arbor Antiques Services promotes a Spring and Fall Round Top Show every year during the nationally known Antiques Festival in Round Top, Texas. Our Round Top show site is located on eight acres at the American Legion Post #338 on Hwy. 237 off of Hwy. 290. We are just 2 miles from downtown Round Top. We offer dealer spaces in an air-conditioned hall and in several large big top tents. We have free admission, free parking and an on-site cafe. As an antique dealer or a shopper, you will not want to miss this antiquing experience in Round Top, Texas.

MARBURGER FARM ANTIQUE SHOW SPECIAL EVENTS FALL 2011 ROUND TOP, TX

August 31st, 2011 by

XXVII FLORENCE INTERNATIONAL ANTIQUES FAIR

July 26th, 2011 by

XXVII FLORENCE INTERNATIONAL ANTIQUES FAIR October 1-9, 2011 at the Palazzo Corsini

July 26th, 2011 by

The 27th Florence International Antiques Fair (aka Florence Biennale) will be hosted this year at the enchanting Palazzo Corsini from October 1st- 9th with a layout masterminded by the Maestro Pier Luigi Pizzi. The Biennale, first started by Mario and Giuseppe Bellini in 1959, is the oldest continuous art and antiques fair in Europe and has become the most important Italian art exhibition in the world.

 

The home to the bi-yearly Florence Biennale since 1997, the Palazzo Corsini in its subdued Baroque style with an 18th-century flair is truly a unique and greatly admired building in Florence and a sight to see in itself. The residence, which was completed only in 1737, is also the proud home of Florence’s most important and historically significant private gallery, boasting a collection, begun in 1765 by Don Lorenzo Corsini, nephew of Pope Clement XII.

 

The works of art displayed by antiquarians from all over the world–74 Italian and 14 foreignare the undisputed stars of the show. The vast variety of the over 3,000 pieces presented at the fair range from paintings to plates and antique books to sculptures.

 

All the works exhibited at the Biennale will be monitored and authenticated by the Scientific Committee. On September 28th, two Committees, the first appointed by the Florence Exports Office, and the second sent by the Ministry for the Cultural Heritage, will examine the works for which the antiquarians request a free circulation certificate, a document which allows Italian works of art to circulate abroad.

 

Collateral Events:

The Biennale continues to support Corri la Vita, an association, devoted to the study and prevention of breast cancer presided over by the Marchioness Bona Frescobaldi. On October 1st a charity evening will be held and during the dinner Christie’s will auction works of art donated by exhibitors at the Biennale. The proceeds of the auction will be devolved entirely in favour of the Association.

 

On October 5th prizes will be awarded to the best painting and sculpture at the Fair. The prizes, amounting to 10,000 Euro each, will be destined to the restoration of a work of art from the public cultural heritage.

 

On October 6th the “Lorenzo d’oro” prize will be awarded to Piero Angela, for his long and successful career as a director of documentaries.

 

 

Press Office:

Sveva Fede, tel. +39 336 693 367, tel. e fax +39 0575 370 368, sveva.fede@libero.it

Press Office for Tuscany:

Anna Pampaloni, tel. +39 055 69 63 65, +39 347 56 20 327, a.pampa@katamail.com

Foreign Press Offices:

Great Britain: Cawdell Douglas, 10-11 Lower John Street, W1R 3PE London (GB), tel. +44 207 439 28 22, fax +44 207 287 54 88, e-mail: press@cawdelldouglas.co.uk

U.S.A.: Jonathan Marder + Company, 24 Fifth Avenue, suite 1530, N.Y. 10011 New York (U.S.A.), tel. +1 646 638 24 79 fax + 1 646 638 25 29, e-mail: m.dattatreya@gsmltd.net

France: Colonnes, Claire Galimard, 16 rue des Saints-Pères, 75007 Paris (France), tel. +33 1 426 070 10, fax +33 1 426 070 07, e-mail: contact@colonnes.com

 

 

Info:

Expo Arte e Cultura S.r.l. – Via del Parione 11 – 50123 Firenze – tel. +39 055 282 283 – +39 055 282 635 – Fax +39 055 214 831 – www.biennaleantiquariato.itinfo@biennaleantiquariato.it

 

Short history of the Florence International Antiques Fair

 

•  The Mostra Internazionale dell’Antiquariato was launched in 1959 in the prestigious premises of Palazzo Strozzi. The Fair was the brainchild of Luigi Bellini Sr., designed to attract to Florence the very best in the international antiques world, and it made its name by offering the choicest selection in the collecting and antiques sector. The overwhelming success of the first Fair, and of those which followed, marked the start of a market season increasingly oriented towards the Antiques Fairs. The originality of the idea, accompanied by an astute selection of the antiquarians, transformed the Fair into a cultural and fashionable event that could not be missed, to the extent that the Florentine Fair was visited both by the members of the international jet set and by a crowd avid for curiosities, knowledge and marvels. The international triumph was triggered by the fact that it was held in Florence and was also accompanied for the entire duration  by a series of highly attractive cultural and society events.

 

  • Problems in the utilisation of Palazzo Strozzi, where adaptation work was being carried out, meant that in 1977 the antiquarians had to move to Palazzo Giuntini (now the Grand Hotel), after which they returned to the original site up to 1993. In 1987, Guido Bartolozzi took over from the Bellini brothers as the General Secretary.

 

  • When Palazzo Strozzi became definitively unavailable in 1995 the Fair had to be moved to the Palazzo degli Affari, a fine building designed by Spadolini, but entirely unsuitable for an antiquarian fair of the level of the Florentine Biennale. For the following editions of the Fair, the choice fell on Palazzo Corsini sull’Arno, the current premises of the event, where it has been held since 1997.

 

•  In 2001 the Management Committee appointed Giovanni Pratesi, Chairman of the Italian Antiquarians Association, as General Secretary of the Florentine Biennale. This appointment represented a crucial turning-point for the Fair and it was in fact in 2001, with an absolutely innovative design and the inclusion of numerous novelties in the general programme, that the Biennale set off on the path that has led to its being considered today as one of the three most important antiques events in the world.

 

• To place the Biennale at the level of the most prestigious international Fairs it was decided to promote strict controls on the works displayed, modify the image of the Fair by entrusting the orchestration to the Maestro Pier Luigi Pizzi, who performed an authentic masterpiece of restyling, introducing a new pavilion in the entrance courtyard of the Palazzo, boost promotion by setting up specialised Press Offices in the major cities of the world (Wiesbaden, London, Paris, New York); extend to the Italian exhibitors the same rights as their foreign counterparts, offering them advance examination of the works on display so as to provide them with export licences before the start of the Fair.

 

 

THE CORSINI PALACE

 

Maria Maddalena Machiavelli, wife of Marchese Filippo Corsini, purchased the Palace from the Grand Duke Ferdinando II in 1649. Her son, Bartolomeo, began remodelling and redecorating the Palace in 1650. Initially the work was done by Alfonso Parigi the Younger, and then by Ferdinando Tacca, who continued with the project until 1671. Actual construction work on the Pa­lace as it stands today was commissioned by Filippo Corsini junior, in 1685, after the death of his father Bartolomeo. Construction was directed by Antonio Ferri, a versatile exponent of the late Baroque Florentine cul­ture. He was a set designer and engineer, who built machines and fortifi­cations and than poured his extraordinary elegance and creative skill into Palazzo Corsini, making it one of Florence most unusually luxurious pala­ces.

The decorations, executed between 1692 and 1700, are among the finest examples of Florentine painting. Among the artists the Corsini family com­missioned to decorate the located, we must mention the outstanding maters Anton Domenico Gabbiani, Alessandro Gherardini and Pier Dandini.

Palazzo Corsini, located on the banks of the Arno river, is in the heart of Florence, just a short walk from the Ponte Vecchio and the Duomo and near the smart Via Tornabuoni.

 

The Salon and the Aurora Gallery

When the Salon in the Palazzo Corsini was inaugurated in the late seven­teenth century, Antonio Ferri’s designs (1694‑1696) must have aroused wide­spread amazement. Entering the room from the grand staircase, which forces a corner view, is an enormous source of wonder. The visitor sees an extra­ordinary room flooded with light reflected from the walls with their co­lumns, bases and rippling cornice. The ceiling in the Salon is decorated with a glorification of the Corsini family, and it supports two gigantic painted wooden chandeliers that were carved by Antonio Francesco Gonelli between 1698 and 1700. The doors of the Salon open onto the adjacent deco­rated rooms.

Size and prestigious location make this splendid salon one of the most sought after reception rooms in the heart of Florence.

The impressive main staircase leads to the Aurora Gallery which is part of the main building: its large, arched windows look onto the courtyard and offer a splendid view of hills on the opposite side of the Arno river.

This luminous and completely frescoed gallery was decorated by Bartolomeo Ne­ri and Alessandro Rosi, and with the other luxurious rooms of Palazzo Cor­sini, will house, from the 30th September to the 9th October, the 24th edition of the Inter­national Antique Fair.

 

The Ballroom

The Ballroom, that overlooks an internal courtyard, is reached via the mid­dle door (on the left) of the Salon. The large crystal chandelier and the gilded eighteenth century wall sconces complete the decorations.

 

The fresco, painted by Alessandro Gherardini between 1695 and 1696 is set in a plasterwork frame enhanced with flowers and two scrolls. In the mid­dle of the composition in Aurora’s chariot drawn by Pegasus. The goddess of dawn, sister of Helios, the sun god, is surrounded by three maidens, the Hours, one of whom is holding a floral crown, while a Putto holding a torch, symbol of the goddess, precedes the chariot. On one edge of the fre­sco, Gherardini painted the Kingdom of Flora, with Zephyr, the young god with butterfly wings and some nymphs accompanying the goddess. On the oppo­site side is the Triumph of Galatea: the sea nymph is on a shell drawn by dolphins, and Polyphemus with his heard is in front of her, playing a love song on his pipe. The care the artist dedicated to the fresco is the fur­ther enhanced by the decorative elements he added: four vases in the cor­ners of the arch; those near the Kingdom of Flora are decorated with gar­lands of flowers, the other two with sea creature and fish. It can be easily said that this fresco is the finest decorative work in the entire Palace.

During the Antiques Fair, the padded and lined with precious silk seats will be removed to protect their integrity.