Collectibles

MARBURGER FARM CELEBRATES 30TH ANTIQUE SHOW APRIL 3-7 IN ROUND TOP From New Kid on the Block to International Blockbuster

February 2nd, 2012 by

1.27.12 Round Top, Texas –  When the Marburger Farm Antique Show burst onto a Texas cow pasture in the fall of 1997, everyone knew that something unique was being branded in Round Top. Halfway between Houston and Austin, dealers called the new show “a breath of fresh air.” Shoppers just said, “Here we come!”

 

But no one knew the disasters of nature and history that the twice-yearly show would face for its first 30 shows over the last 15 years.

 

On Tuesday April 3 through Saturday April 7, 2012, the 30th edition of the Marburger Farm Antique Show will feature over 350 national and international exhibitors, with a crowd of shoppers from across the US and around the world. “Through rain, sleet, snow or 100 degree weather, here they come,” says Tallahassee, FL exhibitor Carol O’Steen. She could have added: through 9/11, through Hurricanes Katrina and Ike, when gas hit $5, when the banks melted down, through two wars and with one show opening in the worst week in the US economy in generations.

 

Why has the Marburger Farm Antique Show been able to flourish during such a difficult era in America?

 

O’Steen continues, “In spite of all that has happened in the world, people still need a break. Marburger Farm is a kind of retreat. Some years people may buy more than other years, but they still come. People look forward to coming to Marburger Farm all year.” The Marburger Farm site includes 43 rolling acres, Lake Marburger, a herd of Texas Longhorns and ten huge tents and twelve historic buildings, jam- packed with antique dealers and select artisans . At the spring show O’Steen will offer over 600 sterling napkin rings and early American coin silver, including rare southern coin silver. “My goal at Marburger is that each person will take time to relax and enjoy the moment—and go home with packages and wonderful memories.”

 

Exhibitor John Gray of Magnolia Pearl reflects that “There is a soul to the people who converge twice a year at Marburger Farm. It’s the spirit of these people coming together— all of that creativity from Europe, from both coasts of the US and from far and wide. It brings an unselfish, uncommon energy to come together in spite of the world’s situation. And, in spite of all that has happened, our show at Marburger has grown stronger every time. Shoppers don’t fly in from all over the world unless the show is outstanding —and Marburger Farm is outstanding.”

 

Magnolia Pearl is one of the original artisan exhibitors at Marburger, bringing old-world inspired clothing and accessories with Magnolia Pearl flair and creativity. “For a lot of Marburger customers,” Gray concludes, “this show is their own artistic expression of who they are. It’s being in an environment where you are seen as an equal, as a like-minded person, oriented to the community of antiques and beauty.”

 

Judy Hill of J Hill Designs agrees. “It takes strong people to create something that gives other people an outlet in the face of disasters. Antique shows are a stress reliever. We are a community, an antiques community. We love to be together and we love what we do. We love the people who come because we all have this in common: we connect over antiques. I don’t even call them customers. They are people who love the same things that I do.” Hill will offer “soft industrial” antiques in metal and wood, plus an arbor and other garden antiques, with lots of white for a spring palette.

 

Other reasons for the success of Marburger Farm have to do with its original founding by veteran dealers John Sauls and Ed Gage. As Sauls puts it, “We wanted a top-quality show that was focused on taking care of vendors. Our thought was: If vendors are happy, customers will be happy.” Sauls’ defining goal for Marburger Farm? “Quality.”

 

In 2007 Margaret Marsh Mebus and her children, their spouses and six grandchildren purchased the show. Marburger took on a more family-friendly feel but the word “quality” continues to guide Marburger Farm —quality, now, on a rather massive scale. Jerry Watkins of Sniktaw Antiques in Gurney, IL says, “Marburger Farm has such an eclectic and quality mix of antiques that it appeals to a wide range of people of all ages. Anyone who is interested in anything can find something at Marburger Farm.  And, even in economic downtimes, quality still sells. Plus, you can find things there that will be nowhere else.”

 

Michael Roberts of Roberts Antiques in Homer, MI lifts up the customer-friendly vibe at Marburger Farm. “We do shows all over America and Marburger Farm is the only place that is consistent, show in, show out. Parking is easy, not a lot of hassle. And Marburger has something for everyone. We have a wide price range.” Roberts will alight in Texas with antiques from France and Italy, plus art, garden antiques, lighting and wicker.

 

There are other reasons for the success of the Marburger Farm Antique Show: the overflowing booth spaces that allow more space for so much more merchandise than at other shows; the long three day set up that gives dealers the time to bring in this unusually massive amount of merchandise. Then there are those stunning booth displays that are now the norm at Marburger Farm. And then there is that strong Texas economy and all those store owners…interior designers…and moms and dads and kids and multiple generations who enjoy being together in the midst of antiques, history and beauty. And who enjoy Marburger cupcakes.

 

Why does Marburger Farm flourish? Lowell Dunn, Canterbury Court, Corsicana, TX echoes the theme: “It’s the excellent mix and quality of the antiques. Even with all that goes on in the world, people still want comfortable homes and to be surrounded with things that they love. That’s what Marburger Farm dealers offer.” Dunn takes great effort to offer it, traveling to England to unearth pottery, Staffordshire, majolica and furniture with an English country home style.

 

Ashley Ferguson, co-owner of the show, looks up from her computer. “We just had an e-mail from a couple in New Zealand, wanting to purchase early buying tickets.” For its 30th show, Marburger Farm customers will come from across oceans, they will come by SUV, pick up and by limos, sometimes they come by horseback or helicopter. “In spite of all that has happened in the world, we have been very fortunate and feel very blessed,” says Ferguson. “We seek out the most creative dealers and artisans from all over the world and they scour the planet for the best antiques on earth. And then it’s all gathered in one place, for only a precious few days —-in a unique setting that can only be Texas.”

 

So come to the Marburger Farm Antique Show this spring and help celebrate our 30th show. We’ll have a full-service cafe, endless supplies of ice tea and lemonade, wi-fi, air-conditioned restrooms, daily cash drawings, cold beer and frozen “Marburitas.” And, if our luck holds out, we’ll also have bluebonnets.

 

The Marburger Farm Antique Show opens for Early Buying with $25 admission on Tuesday April 3 from 10 am through 2 pm, when regular $10 admission begins. One admission is good all week, with the show running on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 am to 5 pm and on Saturday, April 7, from 9 am to 4 pm. Advance tickets and group tickets are available.

 

Antiques, vintage and artisan creations will include American, French, English, Continental, architectural, fine art, jewelry, textiles, mid-century modern, silver, western, garden, painted furniture, early Texas and more. A portion of the spring show proceeds will benefit the Texas Children’s Hospital. Parking is free and admission is free for children 15 and under. Dogs on a leash are always welcome.

 

See information on vendors, the new Marburger Farm mobile app, travel, maps, lodging, on-site shipping and special events at www.roundtop-marburger.com or call Rick McConn at 800-999-2148 or Ashley Ferguson at 800-947-5799.

A&S to auction extraordinary 65-year Roy Gay collection of railroad antiques, March 10-11 in Waco, Texas

February 2nd, 2012 by

This MoPac (Missouri Pacific) railroad lantern with ruby-colored glass is one of approximately 160 lanterns from various train lines in the Roy Gay collection. A&S image.

WACO, Texas – There is no more enduring symbol of how the Old West became part of the New World than the American railroad, with its steam-powered “iron horses” that linked East to West. It is the lifelong fascination with early trains and the culture that surrounded them that inspired the late Roy Gay’s 65-year collection of railroadiana, which will be auctioned in its entirety on March 10-11. A&S Antique Auction Co., specialists in Western Americana, will conduct the sale of the approximately 2,000-piece single-owner collection at its Waco, Texas gallery, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

“Mr. Gay, who passed away on January 11th of this year, gave his whole working life of 40-plus years to the Union Pacific Railroad. He was an auditor for the company and traveled a three-state region in the course of his job, so that opened all the necessary doors to acquire railroad relics. When a depot closed down, he would know about it and be in a position to buy the pieces he wanted,” said A&S’s owner Scott Franks.

 

Roy Gay’s collection of lanterns, railroad advertising signs, tableware, tinware, whiskey crocks and literally anything else that would have been part of a train journey from the late 19th- through mid-20th centuries grew to such size that an unusual step was taken.

 

“This was the worst case of a passionate collector I’ve ever seen,” Franks said with a chuckle. “When he retired, Mr. Gay bought the old railway station at Troup, Texas, and literally had it moved to his East Texas farm. Later, Mr. Gay spent $35,000 to restore the station, which is where he displayed his remarkable collection.”

 

Most of the items Gay collected are from the “golden era” of railroads – the 1880s through middle “teens” – with a smattering of later objects whose timeline ends around the 1970s.

 

Railroad sign whose design was in use from 1890-1930 to advertise MKT (Missouri-Kansas-Texas Lines), one of a multitude of signs in Roy Gay collection. A&S image.

The Waco auction gallery’s walls are a spectacle to behold with the massive sub-collection of approximately 160 railroad lanterns now on display. Many of the lanterns have green, ruby and amber colored glass panels; while a few were made with richly hued cobalt-blue glass. Franks noted that most are signal or switch-type lanterns made by Dietz or other manufacturers. Each is marked with the name of an American railroad.

 

Additionally, there are some very scarce inspectors lanterns with matching IDs on the casing and globe components, and one particularly rare presentation lantern. The grouping also includes many as eight brass firemen’s lanterns, which have a distinctive shape and large, rolled handles that prevented the user’s hands from getting burned.

 

“The lanterns will be accessible to every level of collector,” said Franks. “Their book values range from $50 to $700 apiece.”

 

Selection of blue and white historical-pattern china used in dining cars on the B&O (Baltimore & Ohio) line. A&S image.

Franks predicts crossover competition from antique advertising collectors for the scores of old railroad signs in the Gay collection. Highlights include a beautiful, all-original circa 1890-1930 MKT porcelain sign, conservatively estimated at $2,000-$3,000; and a 36-inch-diameter “buzzsaw” sign, referring to its serrated edges, which advertises Texas Pacific Lines on one side and Missouri Pacific on the other. Franks explained that the sign would be flipped over when a train crossed a state line where one or the other of the companies had jurisdiction.

 

A vast array of railroad tableware incorporates 200-300 pieces of marked china, including a rare dinner plate for the Great Northern Iron Mountain Route’s Sunshine Special, estimate $2,000-$3,000. Other railroad china comes from Missouri Pacific (including service plates), Texas Pacific, MKT, NY Central, Union Pacific and Southern Pacific. Additionally, there is a large assortment of blue china in B&O’s historical pattern.

 

Other food service goods include silver flatware and covered wares marked for dining cars or railroad companies; table linens, 65 railroad-marked sugar tongs, 2-cup pitchers for tea or coffee, creamers, sugar bowls, covered bowls, carafes, pedestaled dessert dishes, and salt and pepper sets.

 

The late Roy Gay prized this beautiful plate from the Great Northern Railroad’s Sunshine Special above all other china in his vast collection. A&S image.

Every train had a galley where beverages and other liquids were stored in crocks. One- and 2-gallon examples marked with railroad names are part of the Gay collection, as are more than 100 crocks marked for brands of whiskey and other alcoholic beverages; saloons and taverns.

 

“Right now, whiskey crocks are one of the hottest tickets in the auction market,” said Franks. “Mr. Gay’s crocks are marked with the name of a person or company, and also, in many cases, the location where the whiskey was distilled. They represent old-time whiskey companies from Texas all the way up to New York. We think collectors are going to really get excited when they see this selection.”

 

Decks of cards in the Roy Gay collection include this rare pack advertising the St. Louis Southwestern Railway’s Cotton Belt Route. A&S image.

Many items kept train passengers occupied on long journeys of a century ago, and nearly all were marked with the names of particular railroads. Among the convenience articles to be auctioned are ashtrays, playing cards (some with an African-American theme), dozens of paper hand fans with advertising, blankets and numerous cast-iron footstools that ladies and children would step onto when boarding a train.

 

Manly metal from the steam-train era will be front and center on auction day, with such contents as railroad-branded locomotive engine bells, spittoons, and brass railroad locks and keys; plus an extremely rare cast-iron stove made by Hart Mfg. of Louisville, Ky., and embossed with the word “Caboose.” Auctioneer Franks, who has handled numerous railroad items over the years, said it is the first of its type he has ever seen.

 

The ‘heavy metal’ section of the sale includes steam locomotive engine bells (as shown), spittoons, brass railroad locks and keys; plus an extremely rare cast-iron caboose stove. A&S image.

Framed decorative artworks from train stations of a bygone era are led by a spectacular panoramic, shadowboxed wildlife photo titled “An Elk Lodge in the Jackson Hole Country Reached via the Union Pacific System.” Measuring 48 inches wide by 12 inches high, the circa-1920s picture was taken on the Steven N. Leek resort lodge and ranch, an elk refuge in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. Leek’s Lodge, which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was destroyed by fire in 1998.

 

The auction offering contains many other desirable railroad mementos, such as caps from conductors, inspectors and engineers; railroad passes, railroad station thermometers that advertise train lines and various products, and 75-80 pieces of railroad-marked tinware for use with diesel cans and other containers.

 

Roy Gay’s 1929 emerald green Model A with camel upholstery and rumble seat. A&S image.

In addition to railroad antiques, the Roy Gay collection includes an extensive selection of early automobilia, 30 to 35 gas pump globes, an 8ft. Mobil Pegasus sign and other advertising; and even a beautiful emerald green 1929 Model A rumble-seat Ford. The car has always been garaged and is drivable.

 

The March 10-11 auction will be held live at A&S Antique Auctions’ gallery, 900 E. Loop 340, Waco, TX 76716, and will start at 10 a.m. Central Time each day. All forms of remote bidding will be available, including absentee, by phone or live via the Internet through LiveAuctioneers.com. For additional information call 254-799-6044 or e-mail asantiques@yahoo.com. Visit the A&S website at www.asauctions.com. View the online catalog at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

USATheatres.com – American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show

January 20th, 2012 by

Appraiser in Collectibles, Memorabilia and Toys to Appear at Old Greenwich Toy, Coin-Op Show

January 20th, 2012 by

 

HERSHEY, Pa – Organizers of the highly anticipated American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show, just announced a new addition for the event that will allow attendees to bring their old toys to be appraised.

 Gary Sohmers, an expert in Pop Culture, Collectibles, Toys and Memorabilia, is scheduled to appear at the show to do Verbal Appraisal Values for Antiques and Collectibles, while occupying a 24 ft. by 8 ft. booth to display and sell merchandise, according to the show’s promoter, USA Theatres.

“Gary Sohmers has appeared as an appraiser in Collectibles, Memorabilia and Toys for 13 seasons on the PBS television program ‘Antiques Roadshow’,” said Ronald M. Vastola, Outreach Coordinator of USA Theatres.  “Mr. Sohmers’ appearance is an extraordinary addition to the show.”

The American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show is set to debut on Saturday, March 3, at the Eastern Civic Center, situated within walking distance from the Metro-North Train Station in Old Greenwich, Connecticut.

According to USA Theatres, the show will feature quality exhibitors buying, selling and trading an array of antique and collectible toys, such as character toys, tin toys, mechanical toys, banks, trains, actions figures, diecast vehicles, games, model kits, advertising items, and coin-ops (jukeboxes, slot machines, etc…).

Some of the high quality dealers who will be exhibiting at the inaugural show include Tom Miano, owner of Serious Toyz; Fred Franklin, owner of Rec Room Specialties; and Mike and Lauren Czajkowski, co-owners of Milo Toys & Collectables, to just name a few.

Additional dealers from New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, who specialize in coin-operated machines and other related antique toys and collectibles, have responded to the show; including Dan Morphy, owner of Morphy Auctions, who is interested in utilizing 24 feet of exhibit space.

A variety of food and beverages will be available for purchase at the show, provided by Joemomma Foods, Inc. of Hershey, Pa.

General admission into the show is $10 for adults, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday; while early buyers are welcome Friday evening at 6:00 p.m. and also Saturday morning at 7:00 a.m. for $20 per person each day.  Parking is free and children under 12 will be admitted for free, accompanied by a paying adult.

Exhibit space is currently available; however, exhibitors are encouraged to sign up soon as spaces are very limited.

 

For further information, call (717) 542-0567 or email usatheatres@yahoo.com

You may also visit the website, www.usatheatres.com/conventions

Anyone wishing to reserve a hotel room should contact the Hilton Stamford Hotel & Executive Meeting Center, the official hotel of the American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show.  The hotel is conveniently located just 1.4 miles, 4 minutes from the Civic Center.

Mention the show to receive a special room rate of just $79 per night (promo code:  AMA).  The hotel can be reached by visiting their website www.hiltonstamfordhotel.com or calling them directly at (203) 967-2222.

 

Serious toys on tap for serious collectors Dealers flowing into March 3 toy, coin-op show

January 16th, 2012 by

Hershey, Pa – USA Theatres, promoters of the upcoming American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show, recently revealed some of the quality dealers who will be exhibiting at the inaugural show.

Tom Miano, owner of Serious Toyz, will be occupying 24 feet of exhibit space, offering a fine variety of vintage toys and collectibles; while Fred Franklin, owner of Rec Room Specialties, will be showing off a great selection of antique slot machines, game machines and other coin-operated related items.

The American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show will feature quality exhibitors buying, selling and trading an array of antique and collectible toys, such as character toys, tin toys, mechanical toys, banks, advertising items and coin-ops, according to the promoters.

The show is set to debut on Saturday, March 3 at the Eastern Civic Center, located at 90 Harding Road in Old Greenwich, Connecticut.

“The location at the Greenwich Civic Center is a highly strategic choice,” said Ronald M. Vastola, Outreach Coordinator of USA Theatres.  The site is conveniently located to most major metropolitan areas in the Northeast, and can easily attract collectors from Maryland, Washington DC, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and of course, the New England states.

“It’s only a 40 minute, $8 ride from Grand Central Terminal in New York City,” Vastola said.  “The Eastern Civic Center in Old Greenwich is situated within walking distance from the Metro-North Train Station.”

Other exhibitors on tap include Mike Milo and Lauren Czajkowski, co-owners of Milo Toys & Collectables; and Ken Laurence, owner of Heroes Unlimited and show promoter of the Super Megashow held in New Jersey and the Boston Super Megafest.

Additional exhibitors from New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, who specialize in jukeboxes, soda machines and gumball machines, have responded to the show; including Dan Morphy, owner of Morphy Auctions, who is interested in utilizing 24 feet of exhibit space.

Anyone planning on attending the show can expect to pay $10 for general admission on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  For the serious collector, early buyers are welcome Friday evening at 6:00 p.m. and also Saturday morning at 7:00 a.m. for $20 per person each day.  Children under 12 will be admitted for free, accompanied by a paying adult.

A variety of food and beverages will be available for purchase, provided by Joemomma Foods, Incorporated of Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Exhibitor space is still currently available; however, exhibitors are encouraged to sign-up soon as spaces are limited.

“It’s going to be a brisk and fantastic show,” Vastola added.

For more information, call (717) 542-0567 or email usatheatres@yahoo.com

You may also visit the website, www.usatheatres.com/conventions

 

For hotel accommodations, you may contact the Hilton Stamford Hotel & Executive Meeting Center, the official hotel of the American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show.

The Hilton is located at 1 First Stamford Place in Stamford, Connecticut, just 1.4 miles, 4 minutes from the Eastern Civic Center.

Mention the show to receive a special room rate of just $79 per night (promo code: AMA).

You may call the hotel directly at (203) 967-2222 or visit their website, www.hiltonstamfordhotel.com

 

Morphy’s Feb. 9-11 auction starts the company’s New Year with toys, trains, advertising, superhero comics

January 11th, 2012 by

1900 Coca-Cola serving tray featuring the soft drink company’s first model, Hilda Clark; 9½ in. diameter. Est. $2,000-$3,500. Morphy Auctions image.

DENVER, Pa. – More than 2,000 lots of antique toys, trains, advertising and rare comics are primed and ready to make their appearance Feb. 9-11 in Morphy Auctions’ first sale of 2012. All forms of bidding will be available, including live via the Internet, with start times set for 10 a.m. on Thursday and Friday, and 9 a.m. for the Saturday session.

 

The fun begins with 350+ lots of Coca-Cola and other soda pop advertising. Highlights include a 1929 Orange Crush calendar with full pad, est. $700-$1,200; a 1900 Coca-Cola serving tray, $3,000-$4,000; and a complete set of 10 original Coca-Cola advertising pocket mirrors from the years 1906-1916. The set is expected to fetch $1,800-$2,500.

 

Following the soda pop section, there will be 150 general advertising lots, including an Ingraham Hills Liver Ticker reverse-on-glass clock with the image of a pretty girl, $3,000-$4,000; and a small grouping of dye cabinets, including examples promoting Peerless Dyes and Diamond Dyes.

 

Plaster Penfold smoking golfer advertising figure, 1930s. Est. $800-$1,200. Morphy Auctions image.

After a very successful initial outing in December at Morphy’s, part two of an advanced collection of advertising figures will cross the auction block, together with additional consignments of comparable quality. In all, there are approximately 100 lots of figures produced from the 1920s to 1950s.

 

“There’s a tremendous variety,” said Morphy Auctions associate Mike Karberg. “Any product you can imagine is included, from alcoholic beverages and sporting goods to clothing, food and consumer goods.”

 

Highlights include an extremely rare Mr. All-American Hot Dog figure advertising Jordan’s Franks, estimate: $1,000-$2,000. Also in the collection are four figural advertising pieces featuring Esquire magazine’s dapper mascot, Esky. From a different consignor comes a 1940s composition advertising figure depicting the “Kelvinator (Refrigerators) Lady.” Estimate: $800-$1,200.

 

The Friday session includes 50+ pressed-steel toys (e.g., Keystone, Buddy ‘L’) and 150 tin wind-up and battery-operated toys, with many key items from Marx and Linemar. A clean Buck Rogers Rocket Fighter in its original box, a Schuco teddy bear on scooter and a desirable boxed Batman battery op are among the top lots. A single-owner collection of approximately 80 Howdy Doody toys will be offered, as well.

 

1966 battery-operated walking Batman toy, tin with vinyl head and original cloth cape, original box. Est. $4,000-$8,000. Morphy Auctions image.

More than 150 European wind-up toy lots span automotive, nautical and other categories. Around 50 colorful penny toys, mostly Continental in origin, are in excellent condition and come from a long-held collection. There are numerous autos, motorcycles and specialty figurals, such as an articulated sailboat and soccer players. An additional European lot in this section is a large “Holland” biscuit tin ship.

 

Among the 200 character lots are 50+ vintage wristwatches, many in their original boxes. Characters represented include Mickey Mouse, the Lone Ranger, Davy Crockett and Donald Duck. A Howdy Doody wristwatch store display is a standout in this category.

 

The Saturday session begins with 50+ figural cast iron lots, including bottle openers, doorknockers and paperweights. Cast-iron mechanical banks are led by a Perfection Registering bank that Morphy’s CEO Dan Morphy says is “one of the nicest examples [he’s] ever seen.” Estimate: $25,000-$35,000. Other mechanicals include a Mammy with Spoon (blue dress version) and a near-mint Santa at the Chimney.

 

Cast-iron Perfection Registering mechanical bank, all original and in working order. Est. $20,000-$30,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Over 100 cast-iron toy lots will cross the auction block, with a large assortment of motorcycles, trucks and cars by Hubley, Arcade and Kenton.

 

A wonderful selection of more than 200 toy train lots awaits bidders, with many pieces coming from the Estate of Kenneth J. Rohrbaugh. “The trains in the Rohrbaugh grouping had been on loan to the Lincoln Train Museum in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania,” explained Morphy’s Chief Operating Officer Tom Sage Jr.

 

The predicted top lot in the train section is an outstanding Lionel Mickey Mouse Circus Train set, complete with its original box and cardboard inserts. Additionally, there are many excellent prewar Lionel 0 gauge passenger sets with original boxes, an American Flyer standard gauge stadium set in original set box, and a number of more contemporary trains, including productions from MPC and MTH (Mike’s Train House.)

 

“There’s a good mix of trains,” said Sage, “including a standard gauge white Ives 3243 set, an American Flyer President’s Special set, Marklin and other European trains.”

 

‘The Amazing Spider-Man’ No. 1 comic book, 1963, CGC-graded 8.5 with off-white pages. Est. $25,000-$30,000. Morphy Auctions image.

With the expert oversight of Brian Schutzer and Pittsburgh’s legendary Sparkle City Comics, Morphy’s will launch its new Comic Books division during the third session of the Feb. 9-11 event. More than 250 prized comics from an original-owner collection will be offered, including a 1963 The Amazing Spider-Man No. 1, CGC-graded in 8.5 condition, which is expected to realize $25,000-$30,000. Other anticipated top lots include a 1963 X-Men No. 1 and a 1963 Tales of Suspense No. 39 featuring the first appearance of Iron Man.

 

All forms of bidding will be available for Morphy’s Feb. 9-11, 2012 auction, including live at the gallery, phone, absentee, and live via the Internet through Morphy Live or LiveAuctioneers.com. The auction will commence at 10 a.m. Eastern Time on Thursday, Feb. 9 and Friday, Feb. 10; and at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11. For additional information, call 717-335-3435 or email serena@morphyauctions.com. View the fully illustrated catalog online at www.morphyauctions.com.

Tonya A. Cameron to auction Asian art, antiques and historical ephemera from estate of Boston theater critic Dr. Caldwell Titcomb

December 30th, 2011 by

Brandeis professor emeritus was noted African-American history scholar

 

Giant in Tower mechanical bank, 1902, John Harper Ltd., from a collection of cast-iron banks to be auctioned in the opening session. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

SAUGUS, Mass. – Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers will present selections from the estate of theater critic, university professor and African-American history scholar Dr. Caldwell Titcomb in a Thursday, Jan. 12 evening auction at the company’s suburban Boston gallery. Internet live bidding will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

The 350-lot sale, which will be divided into two consecutive sessions, includes important archival documents and other ephemera from Dr. Titcomb’s historical research, as well as Asian art and bronzes; furniture and several paintings. Additional private consignments from New England residences include collections of antique mechanical banks and toys; 19th-century rifles, fine diamond jewelry and American sterling silver.

 

“There’s more than enough in this sale to keep people interested and on their seats, but we also enjoy playing host to our guests, so there will be a complimentary hors d’oeuvres smorgasbord and beverages available for all who attend,” said Tonya Cameron.

 

Session I, starting at 5 p.m., features a single-owner collection of approximately 20 cast-iron mechanical banks of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Among them are an Eagle and Eaglets, Humpty Dumpty, Trick Dog, Teddy (Roosevelt) and the Bear, full-figure Uncle Sam, Artillery, and Uncle Remus. A coveted English production known as the Giant in Tower bank was made in 1902 by John Harper Ltd.

 

The bank collector also amassed a number of amusing battery-operated toys from the 1950s and ’60s. The grouping includes Shoeshine Bear, Mambo Elephant, Drinking Monkey, Clown Playing Xylophone, and Sneezing Bear. A Bubble Blowing Monkey is similar in design to the battery ops but functions via an electrical plug. The opening session also contains a few boxed space-theme and wind-up toys.

 

File copy of Dr. Caldwell Titcomb’s 1966 letter to Amherst College inquiring about the dates during which “famous Negro abolitionist Robert Purvis” may have been a student there. Archive of Dr. Caldwell Titcomb. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

At approximately 6:15 p.m., the 300-lot session featuring Dr. Titcomb’s estate items will commence. Tonya Cameron said she is honored that her company was chosen to auction the late professor’s collections.

 

“Dr. Titcomb was an intellectual fixture in Boston’s theater scene. He had been a professor at Brandeis University, was a longtime theater critic and a passionate musician and composer. On top of that, he was deeply interested in African-American history and left an extraordinary archive of letters – some historical and some his own – and other ephemera documenting decades of study in that field,” Cameron said.

 

A file copy of an Aug. 6, 1966 letter from the Titcomb archive attests to the late professor’s fastidious attention to detail. In that letter to Amherst College’s Alumni Records Department, Titcomb informs that he is researching “early Negro college students” and wishes to clarify a possible historical discrepancy. He asks if Amherst’s records can confirm whether or not “the famous Negro abolitionist Robert Purvis” attended, but did not graduate from, Amherst College prior to 1826. In his letter, Titcomb explains that he wishes to confirm a published statement he had seen regarding Purvis’ matriculation at Amherst, noting that the timeframe stated seemed “odd, since Purvis was not born until 1810.”

 

The ephemera highlights also include a typed manuscript for a play Titcomb wrote, and five personally assembled scrap albums of obituaries, biographies and other materials pertaining to theatrical luminaries from around the world. “It’s a remarkable time capsule,” Cameron observed.

 

Pair of large, bronze foo dogs, Estate of Dr. Caldwell Titcomb. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

Dr. Titcomb embraced many cultures and traveled extensively across Asia, acquiring 18th, 19th and 20th century antiques. The auction selection includes many bronzes in the $500-$1,000 range and several in the $200-$500 range. The top lot of this category is a pair of large bronze foo dogs estimated at $2,000-$3,000.

 

Ceramics include Imari and Moriagi productions and a beautiful Kutani porcelain vase in an orange and blue colorway. Carved hardstone figurals will be offered in group lots.

 

Louise Davies Webber abstract watercolor painting. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

Also coming from the Titcomb estate are abstract paintings by Maine landscape and still life artist Louise Davies Webber, a Chinese sword with decorated handle and scabbard; and an Indian sword with figural hilt.

 

Private consignments yielded an extensive Reed & Barton 24-place-setting sterling silver flatware set in the Burgundy pattern. While a few of the settings lack their salad forks, the silver suite includes desirable butter pats and knives; and many unusual serving pieces such as a stuffing spoon and large meat fork. The set is housed in a mahogany chest and carries a presale estimate of $4,000-$5,000.

 

Gorham 6-piece coffee, tea and water kettle set with tray, 1950s. Est. $4,000-$4,500. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

Another silver highlight is a Gorham 6-piece coffee, tea and water kettle set. The midcentury service, complete with tray, is expected to make $4,000-$4,500.

 

Firearms are led by a G. Hyslop antique flintlock Kentucky long gun and Thompson/Center 50 caliber flintlock. Other collectible weapons include an 1880s-era Turkish flintlock pistol and an Allen Thurber & Co. pocket pistol with an 1845 patent. Civil War books and etchings complete the section.

 

(Top) 1880s-era Turkish flintlock pistol and (bottom) Allen Thurber & Co. pocket pistol with an 1845 patent. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

The auction’s broad variety of goods also includes 18th century Spanish Colonial paintings, Abe Blashko drawings, bronzes by listed artists, a fine campaign chest on pedestal, five vintage Brunswick ivory-tipped pool cues with pearl and ivory inlay; and gold and diamond estate jewelry.

 

Tonya A. Cameron’s auction featuring selections from the estate of Dr. Caldwell Titcomb will take place on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2012, at the company’s gallery at 113 Bennett Highway, Saugus, MA 01906, commencing at 5 p.m. Eastern time. Preview: Jan. 11 from 12-5 and Jan. 12 from 12-4:45.

 

All forms of bidding will be available, including telephone, absentee and online through LiveAuctioneers.com. For additional information, call 781-233-0006 or e-mail tac602@gmail.com. Visit Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers online at www.tacauctioneers.com.

Gold coins, spectacular jewels and art in Government Auction’s Jan. 1 sale

December 20th, 2011 by

1795 13-leaves $10 gold eagle coin, graded NGC AU by Numismatic Guaranty Corp., est. $123,000-$246,000. Government Auction image

TEHACHAPI, Calif. – On Jan. 1, 2012, California-based Government Auction will host its seventh annual New Year’s sale, featuring rare gold coins, fine jewelry and gems; art and antique music machines. More than two million dollars in merchandise will be sold to the highest bidder at the event, which is structured as an absentee, phone and Internet auction, with Internet live bidding available through LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

The company traditionally reserves for its annual New Year’s sale only the best and most valuable items in its inventory. “It takes a lot of time to prepare for our New Year’s auction, but it’s always worth it. Collectors love it because most of the lots have no reserve and start with an opening bid of only one or two dollars,” said Chris Budge, of Government Auction’s Marketing department.

 

A strong candidate for top lot of the 2,000-lot sale is a 1795 13-leaves $10 gold eagle coin. Fewer than 5,100 gold eagle coins were minted in 1795 – some with the eagle grasping a branch with 13 leaves and others with nine leaves. Only 400 to 500 examples of the 13-leaves coin are known to exist. These coins hold strong interest with collectors because they were the first U.S. gold eagle coins to be stamped. Designed by Robert Scott, each weighs 17.5 grams and has 91.7% gold content. The coin in Government Auction’s sale is graded NGC AU by Numismatic Guaranty Corp., and is expected to make $123,000-$246,000.

 

Additional coin highlights include an 1882-CC $20 Liberty Head coin, est. $37,500-$75,000; and a 901-S Barber 25-cent coin, est. $70,500-$141,000.

 

18K yellow and white gold necklace with 35 emeralds weighing 19.02 carats and 288 diamonds weighing 7.20 carats. Estimate $43,000-$86,000. Government Auction image.

Several truly exquisite necklaces are entered in the auction. A design in 18K yellow and white gold features 35 emeralds with a total weight of 19.02 carats and 288 diamonds having a total weight of 7.20 carats. The Gemological Laboratory of America has valued the necklace at $86,419. It carries a presale estimate of $43,000-$86,000.

 

An 18K yellow gold necklace with 36.15 carats of genuine Ceylon cabochon sapphires and 3.5 carats of diamonds could fetch $32,000-$64,000; while a striking 7.90-carat cabochon ruby pendant-style 14K gold necklace is estimated at $18,000-$36,000. The ruby in the latter necklace is a blood-red color and serves as the focal point of three stepped squares of surrounding diamonds. The pendant is suspended from a heavily diamond-encrusted necklace. Estimate: $18,000-$36,000. Yet another select entry is the 2,281.35-carat faceted emerald gemstone, described as having a “dark tone with strong, vivid saturation.” The massive emerald could realize as much as $80,000 on auction day.

John Lewis Brown (French/Scottish ancestry, 1829-1892), signed landscape with figures, horses, dogs. Oil on board, 18 x 22in., est. $13,500-$27,000. Government Auction image.

 

A signed John Lewis Brown (French/Scottish ancestry, 1829-1892) oil-on-board painting showcases the artist’s skill in painting equine, canine and military subjects. “Brown was influenced by the Impressionists, especially Degas, which is obvious in this painting,” said Budge. The framed 18 by 22in. pastoral work is estimated at $13,500-$27,000.

 

The auction will not be short of musical accompaniment with a 1940s Rock-Ola jukebox in the lineup. The classic jukebox plays 78 RPM records and exudes visual appeal with its colorful, illuminating Art Deco façade. Estimate: $5,100-$10,200. Two early forms of mechanical musical entertainment will be available to bidders, as well. A rare Polyphon music box in immaculate condition carries an estimate of $10,500-$21,000; while a Regina upright music box in mint condition and accompanied by 15 discs may climb much higher, to its estimate of $57,000-$114,000.

 

1940s Rock-Ola jukebox with illuminating Art Deco façade, est. $5,100-$10,200. Government Auction image.

From the same general timeframe as the mechanical music machines, a Caille upright 5-cent slot machine is richly decorative, with a copper marquee, front plates, paw feet and additional trim to its handsome oak body. A stunning work of art, its target price is $66,000-$132,000.

 

Sports fans won’t want to miss the opportunity to bid on a custom-matted and framed collage of autographs, images and collector sports cards representing the athletes known collectively as the “NBA 60 Greatest Players.” Among the superstars included in the collage are Michael Jordan, Wilt Chamberlain, “Pistol” Pete Maravich, Larry Bird, Magic Johnson, Kobe Bryant, Julius “Dr. J” Erving, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Shaquille O’Neal and many other masters of the hardcourt. An estimate of $14,997-$29,994 has been set on this lot.

 

Government Auction’s Jan. 1, 2012 New Year’s Day sale will commence at 7:30 a.m. Pacific Time/10:30 a.m. Eastern Time. Absentee, phone and Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com will be available. For additional information on any lot in the sale, call Debbie on 661-823-1543 or e-mail info@governmentauction.com.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Don Presley’s New Year’s auction features sterling, Asian art, clocks and Scottish Rite’s treasured antique marble sculpture ‘Paetus et Aria’

December 20th, 2011 by

Antique marble copy of ‘The Gaul Killing Himself and His Wife,’ a k a ‘Paetus et Aria,’ 94 inches tall, 42 inches wide inclusive of custom-made marble base. Provenance: Collection of the Scottish Rite Library & Museum. Estimate $40,000-$75,000. Don Presley Auctions image.

ORANGE, Calif. – A superb European sculpture unveiled at the Los Angeles Scottish Rite Cathedral on Christmas Day of 1913 is the highlight of Don Presley’s Dec. 31-Jan. 1 New Year’s Auction. The sale features 1,000 lots of antiques, Asian and other fine art, plus a bumper selection described by Presley as “a gallery of amusements.”

 

The headliner – a Carrara marble grouping known variously as ‘Paetus et Aria,’ ‘The Gaul Killing Himself and His Wife,’ and ‘The Galatian Suicide’ – is a copy of the Hellenistic 3rd century B.C. original by Epignonos, ex Boncompagni Ludovisi Collection. In 1900, the Italian State purchased the original – and 103 other sculptures – from the royal Boncompagni Ludovisi family for ensconcement in the Pergamum Museo Nazionale at Palazzo Altemps.

 

A deaccession from the Scottish Rite Library & Museum, the antique copy of the famous Greek statue in Presley’s sale – whose exact age is unknown – comes with a written history from Masonic archives. In its post-Christmas 1913 “Bulletin to the Los Angeles Consistory,” an article describes the statue – a gift from Scottish Rite member V.M. William Rhodes Hervey – as “one of the finest marbles in America, not unworthy of being the center of [the Cathedral’s] collection of statuary, pictures and books.”

 

The statue measures 94 inches tall by 42 inches wide, inclusive of custom-made marble base, and is expected to make $40,000-$75,000 at auction.

 

Pair of antique Chinese huanghuali chairs in mint condition, previously in a Los Angeles residence. Est. $15,000-$25,000.

Presley’s New Year’s sale also features an extensive selection of top-quality ivory and Asian antiques. A pair of coveted Chinese huanghuali chairs in spotless condition came from a Los Angeles residence. Auctioneer Don Presley explained that one reason chairs of this type are so scarce is because the wood from which they are constructed is only rarely found in pieces large enough to be used in furniture.

 

“Huanghuali chairs were made for emperors and royalty from exotic hardwoods in the rosewood family that have an especially beautiful grain and pattern of knots,” Presley said. “They can fetch high prices at auction. We have placed a conservative estimate of $15,000-$25,000 on the chairs consigned to our sale.”

 

Another Asian highlight is a 19th-century carved bone over wood statue of Guanyin. The figure, which has an ivory face and hands, holds a candle and has a phoenix (bird) ornament in its hair. It carries an estimate of $8,000-$15,000.

 

Rolex Daytona wristwatch, Model 16520 with Zenith movement, original box, est. $12,000-$20,000. Don Presley Auctions image.

Approximately 200 antique clocks will be auctioned, including 40 more from the same Beverly Hills collection that highlighted Presley’s Nov. 5-6 sale. The grouping includes French and other European clocks, carriage, boulle and tortoiseshell; champleve, gilt-bronze, jewel-face and American clocks (Tiffany, Ansonia, etc.). There are also a few wall and mantel clocks.

 

Several impressive diamonds, sized from 2 to 3 carats each, add a fine edge to the sale, as does a Rolex Daytona Model 16520 Oyster Perpetual man’s wristwatch with Zenith movement. With original box, the classic timepiece could realize $12,000-$20,000.

 

An Art Deco sterling silver tea set marked “Jimenez” is a premier example of Mexican craftsmanship. The teapot and accessory pieces are stamped ‘Sterling 925’ and have a fluted exterior, while the stamped tray is adorned by a substantial, wide repousse trim. The stylish set weighs in at 159.6 troy ounces and is estimated at $8,000-$12,000.

 

Art deco sterling silver tea set, Mexican, marked ‘Jimenez,’ 159.6 troy ounces. Est. $8,000-$12,000. Don Presley Auctions image.

The perfect furnishing in which to display a tea set of such quality is the 19th-century bronze ormolu vitrine that comes to the auction from a residence in the exclusive Orange Park Acres section of Orange County. With cartouches hand painted in the vernis Martin style, and with its original glass intact, the elegant vitrine could fetch $4,000-$6,000.

 

Don Presley has amassed an assortment of unusual amusements for his Dec. 31-Jan. 1 sale. Several were featured on the History Channel’s new show Real Deal, which is taped at Presley’s gallery. They include a 1957 Williams “Deluxe Baseball” pinball machine, est. $3,500-$5,500; and a fully documented circa-1891 binnacle from the Spanish flagship Infanta Maria Teresa, $15,000-$25,000. A third item that appeared on Real Deal is a circa-1900 medical device called a “nebulizer.” Presley explained that the device was used in upscale medical or dental practices and produced a mist for inhalation by patients. Estimate: $1,200-$1,800.

 

Circa-1900 nebulizer, 46in. tall, used in upscale medical or dental practices to produce mist to be inhaled by patients. Restored, retains original bottles. Featured on History Channel’s ‘Real Deal.’ Est. $1,200-$1,800. Don Presley Auctions image.

A special transportation attraction that would be right at home at Knott’s Berry Farm is a Butterfield stagecoach, 3/4 size, made around 1942 for use in parades, rodeos and other festive events. The vehicle has perfect wheels, is leather slung with barrel sides and even has lanterns to accommodate candles, in the manner of 19th-century stagecoaches. The auction estimate is $25,000-$30,000. For those who favor the Mod era, a pair of zippy 1960s Vespa scooters may fit the bill, with an estimate of $2,000-$3,000 apiece.

 

Additional entries of note include a Capodimonte chess set on a wood base with bronze ormolu, est. $1,500-$2,500; a sizable collection of Roseville, Bauer and other California pottery; fine porcelains, various other fine and decorative-art objects; and 200 Hummel figurines. A 5ft. 6in. electric automaton organ grinder and monkey comes with cassettes to provide a musical accompaniment.

 

Both the Saturday and Sunday sessions will commence at 12 noon Pacific Time. Preview Mon.-Sat. 10-5. The gallery is located at 1319 W. Katella Ave., Orange, CA 92867. All forms of bidding will be available, including live at the gallery, by phone, absentee or live via the Internet through LiveAuctioneers.com. For additional information, call Don Presley at 714-633-2437 or e-mail info@donpresleyauction.com. Visit the company’s website at www.donpresleyauction.com.

 

 

Marklin boat, Ives man on rocking horse top the parade of toys at Bertoia’s $1.55M auction, Nov. 11-12

December 14th, 2011 by

Top lot of the sale: Ives cloth-dressed man on tin rocking horse, ex Tom Anderson collection, $39,100. Bertoia Auctions image.

VINELAND, N.J. – Collectors in a quest to find rare antique toys in superior condition struck gold at Bertoia’s Nov. 11-12 Toys on World Tour auction, which realized $1,550,000 (inclusive of 15% buyer’s premium). The 1,502-lot sale was very well attended, with phone bidders keeping Bertoia’s staff members constantly engaged. Internet bidding played a major role in the auction’s success, as well. The daily average of purchases attributable to online buyers was 27.4%.

 

Cast-iron toys proved to be a category with resiliency, as evidenced by the setting of several world auction records. “I would say that at this auction cast iron was not only back, but back to the future. That’s how strong it was,” said Bertoia Auctions associate Rich Bertoia. “The Donald Kaufman auction series, which grossed over twelve million dollars, seems to have reignited the fever of collecting cast iron. We even saw a few new players at the sale.”

 

Circa-1932 Arcade cast-iron Mack dump truck, ex Larry Seiber collection, finest of all known examples, $17,250. Bertoia Auctions image.

A circa-1932 Arcade cast-iron rendition of a Mack dump truck in bright red and yellow, came with provenance from the respected Larry Sieber collection, Considered the finest known specimen of its type, the 9-inch, near-mint truck claimed the top spot in its category at $17,250.

 

Having passed through Bertoia’s gallery before, during the Kaufman series, a 17-inch Kenton cast-iron “Speed” truck painted green with a stake-side open body toppled its previous auction price to sell for $12,650 against an estimate of $6,000-$7,500. “There were many other pieces from both the Don Kaufman and Dick Ford collections that followed that same pattern, selling for much more than they had in recent auctions. They still had their previous Bertoia tags on them,” Rich Bertoia noted.

 

Marklin ‘Avalanche’ tinplate clockwork gunboat, 16 inches long, $41,400. Bertoia Auctions image.

Another surprise was the buoyant prices achieved by German clockwork tin boats. “Normally in a single auction we don’t get as many all-original or nearly all-original boats of such outstanding quality, but it happened this time,” said Bertoia.

 

An exceptionally well-scaled Marklin “Avalanche” painted in light blue and with all four lifeboats, two stacks, flags and other original accessories had no trouble sailing to $41,400 against an estimate of $20,000-$22,000. Other big winners by Marklin included a “Puritan” oceanliner, $23,000; “Columbia” battleship (partially restored), $18,400; and 1930s “Freya” battleship, $17,250 against an estimate of $8,000-$10,000.

 

Additional European tin toys that won favor with bidders included a Hans Eberl two-seat clockwork tourer with turbaned driver, clown passengers, and Punch & Judy and other clown images lithographed on its exterior panels. Estimated at $600-$750, the vibrantly colorful open car made $10,925. An earlier production dating to around 1900, a Guntherman 12-inch vis-à-vis with hand-painted driver figure surpassed its estimate to reach $5,175.

 

Circa-1870s Fallows American hand-painted tin wagon advertising ‘Fancy Goods, Toys & Notions,’ $10,350. Bertoia Auctions image

“What was interesting about the European toys is that there were many Europeans on the phones who were extremely competitive but could not win against bidders in the room. It seemed that the estimates didn’t matter,” said Bertoia.

 

Over the past decade, the market for early American tin toys has confirmed that demand continues to exceed supply for rare and fine examples. A nice selection of this specialty was included in Bertoia’s sale, with the leading piece being an extremely rare Ives Man on Rocking Horse, ex Tom Anderson collection, that raced past its $6,000-$8,000 estimate to cross the finish line at $39,100.

 

Of the collection of biscuit tins offered, “those in great condition brought great money,” Bertoia said. A circa-1920 W. Crawford & Sons “Fire Brigade” tin – one of the featured items on Bertoia’s auction catalog cover – benefited from crossover bidding from firefighting fans and commanded $6,900 (est. $1,000-$1,200). One of only two or three known examples of a tin pram with baby and golliwog lithographed on its lid was a runaway favorite and earned $6,325 against an estimate of $700-$900.

 

Hand-painted cast-iron doorstop depicting snow-capped cottage, book example, $5,175. Bertoia Auctions image.

Almost every sale conducted by Bertoia’s features an array of excellent-quality cast-iron doorstops. The Nov. 11-12 offering included a charming rarity: a snow-capped yellow cottage with hand painting reminiscent of Grandma Moses’ primitive New England style. The doorstop was a book example and had been entered in the sale with a $1,200-$1,600 estimate. “Apparently there were many bidders who wanted this doorstop for their collections. It sold for $5,175,” said Bertoia Auctions’ owner Jeanne Bertoia, who is, herself, a renowned expert and author on the subject of antique doorstops.

 

Other sale highlights included an Asahi 1962 Chrysler Imperial tin car in rich cobalt blue, $6,900; and a 30-inch-tall, signed Vichy automaton of a beautiful lady with hand mirror. Superbly modeled and painted, with a Jumeau bisque head accented by pearl “drop” earrings, the elegantly dressed automaton soared to $18,400 against an estimate of $6,000-$9,000.

Figural foot-shape Halloween lantern, $4,025. Bertoia Auctions image.

 

The much-anticipated selection of Christmas antiques attracted bidders across the board, but most especially toward the rarely seen antiques. “Collectors are waiting for the great things to come out, and they’ll pay the price to get them,” said Rich Bertoia.

 

The Christmas section was led by a late-19th-century chalkware belsnickle, 22 inches tall, painted in brown and red with holly and berries on the hood of its knee-length coat. Estimated at $10,000-$12,000, it was pushed competitively to $18,400.

 

Bertoia’s Spring Auction will be held March 23-24, 2012 and will feature doorstops from the Chuck and Barbara Cook collection, comic character toys from the Ronnie Rosen collection, cast-iron rarities from a private collection, Lehmann and Martin windups, steam engines and many other choice pieces. For additional information call 856-692-8697, e-mail toys@bertoiaauctions.com, or visit www.bertoiaauctions.com.