Antiques

MARBURGER FARM CELEBRATES 30TH ANTIQUE SHOW APRIL 3-7 IN ROUND TOP From New Kid on the Block to International Blockbuster

February 2nd, 2012 by

1.27.12 Round Top, Texas –  When the Marburger Farm Antique Show burst onto a Texas cow pasture in the fall of 1997, everyone knew that something unique was being branded in Round Top. Halfway between Houston and Austin, dealers called the new show “a breath of fresh air.” Shoppers just said, “Here we come!”

 

But no one knew the disasters of nature and history that the twice-yearly show would face for its first 30 shows over the last 15 years.

 

On Tuesday April 3 through Saturday April 7, 2012, the 30th edition of the Marburger Farm Antique Show will feature over 350 national and international exhibitors, with a crowd of shoppers from across the US and around the world. “Through rain, sleet, snow or 100 degree weather, here they come,” says Tallahassee, FL exhibitor Carol O’Steen. She could have added: through 9/11, through Hurricanes Katrina and Ike, when gas hit $5, when the banks melted down, through two wars and with one show opening in the worst week in the US economy in generations.

 

Why has the Marburger Farm Antique Show been able to flourish during such a difficult era in America?

 

O’Steen continues, “In spite of all that has happened in the world, people still need a break. Marburger Farm is a kind of retreat. Some years people may buy more than other years, but they still come. People look forward to coming to Marburger Farm all year.” The Marburger Farm site includes 43 rolling acres, Lake Marburger, a herd of Texas Longhorns and ten huge tents and twelve historic buildings, jam- packed with antique dealers and select artisans . At the spring show O’Steen will offer over 600 sterling napkin rings and early American coin silver, including rare southern coin silver. “My goal at Marburger is that each person will take time to relax and enjoy the moment—and go home with packages and wonderful memories.”

 

Exhibitor John Gray of Magnolia Pearl reflects that “There is a soul to the people who converge twice a year at Marburger Farm. It’s the spirit of these people coming together— all of that creativity from Europe, from both coasts of the US and from far and wide. It brings an unselfish, uncommon energy to come together in spite of the world’s situation. And, in spite of all that has happened, our show at Marburger has grown stronger every time. Shoppers don’t fly in from all over the world unless the show is outstanding —and Marburger Farm is outstanding.”

 

Magnolia Pearl is one of the original artisan exhibitors at Marburger, bringing old-world inspired clothing and accessories with Magnolia Pearl flair and creativity. “For a lot of Marburger customers,” Gray concludes, “this show is their own artistic expression of who they are. It’s being in an environment where you are seen as an equal, as a like-minded person, oriented to the community of antiques and beauty.”

 

Judy Hill of J Hill Designs agrees. “It takes strong people to create something that gives other people an outlet in the face of disasters. Antique shows are a stress reliever. We are a community, an antiques community. We love to be together and we love what we do. We love the people who come because we all have this in common: we connect over antiques. I don’t even call them customers. They are people who love the same things that I do.” Hill will offer “soft industrial” antiques in metal and wood, plus an arbor and other garden antiques, with lots of white for a spring palette.

 

Other reasons for the success of Marburger Farm have to do with its original founding by veteran dealers John Sauls and Ed Gage. As Sauls puts it, “We wanted a top-quality show that was focused on taking care of vendors. Our thought was: If vendors are happy, customers will be happy.” Sauls’ defining goal for Marburger Farm? “Quality.”

 

In 2007 Margaret Marsh Mebus and her children, their spouses and six grandchildren purchased the show. Marburger took on a more family-friendly feel but the word “quality” continues to guide Marburger Farm —quality, now, on a rather massive scale. Jerry Watkins of Sniktaw Antiques in Gurney, IL says, “Marburger Farm has such an eclectic and quality mix of antiques that it appeals to a wide range of people of all ages. Anyone who is interested in anything can find something at Marburger Farm.  And, even in economic downtimes, quality still sells. Plus, you can find things there that will be nowhere else.”

 

Michael Roberts of Roberts Antiques in Homer, MI lifts up the customer-friendly vibe at Marburger Farm. “We do shows all over America and Marburger Farm is the only place that is consistent, show in, show out. Parking is easy, not a lot of hassle. And Marburger has something for everyone. We have a wide price range.” Roberts will alight in Texas with antiques from France and Italy, plus art, garden antiques, lighting and wicker.

 

There are other reasons for the success of the Marburger Farm Antique Show: the overflowing booth spaces that allow more space for so much more merchandise than at other shows; the long three day set up that gives dealers the time to bring in this unusually massive amount of merchandise. Then there are those stunning booth displays that are now the norm at Marburger Farm. And then there is that strong Texas economy and all those store owners…interior designers…and moms and dads and kids and multiple generations who enjoy being together in the midst of antiques, history and beauty. And who enjoy Marburger cupcakes.

 

Why does Marburger Farm flourish? Lowell Dunn, Canterbury Court, Corsicana, TX echoes the theme: “It’s the excellent mix and quality of the antiques. Even with all that goes on in the world, people still want comfortable homes and to be surrounded with things that they love. That’s what Marburger Farm dealers offer.” Dunn takes great effort to offer it, traveling to England to unearth pottery, Staffordshire, majolica and furniture with an English country home style.

 

Ashley Ferguson, co-owner of the show, looks up from her computer. “We just had an e-mail from a couple in New Zealand, wanting to purchase early buying tickets.” For its 30th show, Marburger Farm customers will come from across oceans, they will come by SUV, pick up and by limos, sometimes they come by horseback or helicopter. “In spite of all that has happened in the world, we have been very fortunate and feel very blessed,” says Ferguson. “We seek out the most creative dealers and artisans from all over the world and they scour the planet for the best antiques on earth. And then it’s all gathered in one place, for only a precious few days —-in a unique setting that can only be Texas.”

 

So come to the Marburger Farm Antique Show this spring and help celebrate our 30th show. We’ll have a full-service cafe, endless supplies of ice tea and lemonade, wi-fi, air-conditioned restrooms, daily cash drawings, cold beer and frozen “Marburitas.” And, if our luck holds out, we’ll also have bluebonnets.

 

The Marburger Farm Antique Show opens for Early Buying with $25 admission on Tuesday April 3 from 10 am through 2 pm, when regular $10 admission begins. One admission is good all week, with the show running on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 am to 5 pm and on Saturday, April 7, from 9 am to 4 pm. Advance tickets and group tickets are available.

 

Antiques, vintage and artisan creations will include American, French, English, Continental, architectural, fine art, jewelry, textiles, mid-century modern, silver, western, garden, painted furniture, early Texas and more. A portion of the spring show proceeds will benefit the Texas Children’s Hospital. Parking is free and admission is free for children 15 and under. Dogs on a leash are always welcome.

 

See information on vendors, the new Marburger Farm mobile app, travel, maps, lodging, on-site shipping and special events at www.roundtop-marburger.com or call Rick McConn at 800-999-2148 or Ashley Ferguson at 800-947-5799.

A&S to auction extraordinary 65-year Roy Gay collection of railroad antiques, March 10-11 in Waco, Texas

February 2nd, 2012 by

This MoPac (Missouri Pacific) railroad lantern with ruby-colored glass is one of approximately 160 lanterns from various train lines in the Roy Gay collection. A&S image.

WACO, Texas – There is no more enduring symbol of how the Old West became part of the New World than the American railroad, with its steam-powered “iron horses” that linked East to West. It is the lifelong fascination with early trains and the culture that surrounded them that inspired the late Roy Gay’s 65-year collection of railroadiana, which will be auctioned in its entirety on March 10-11. A&S Antique Auction Co., specialists in Western Americana, will conduct the sale of the approximately 2,000-piece single-owner collection at its Waco, Texas gallery, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

“Mr. Gay, who passed away on January 11th of this year, gave his whole working life of 40-plus years to the Union Pacific Railroad. He was an auditor for the company and traveled a three-state region in the course of his job, so that opened all the necessary doors to acquire railroad relics. When a depot closed down, he would know about it and be in a position to buy the pieces he wanted,” said A&S’s owner Scott Franks.

 

Roy Gay’s collection of lanterns, railroad advertising signs, tableware, tinware, whiskey crocks and literally anything else that would have been part of a train journey from the late 19th- through mid-20th centuries grew to such size that an unusual step was taken.

 

“This was the worst case of a passionate collector I’ve ever seen,” Franks said with a chuckle. “When he retired, Mr. Gay bought the old railway station at Troup, Texas, and literally had it moved to his East Texas farm. Later, Mr. Gay spent $35,000 to restore the station, which is where he displayed his remarkable collection.”

 

Most of the items Gay collected are from the “golden era” of railroads – the 1880s through middle “teens” – with a smattering of later objects whose timeline ends around the 1970s.

 

Railroad sign whose design was in use from 1890-1930 to advertise MKT (Missouri-Kansas-Texas Lines), one of a multitude of signs in Roy Gay collection. A&S image.

The Waco auction gallery’s walls are a spectacle to behold with the massive sub-collection of approximately 160 railroad lanterns now on display. Many of the lanterns have green, ruby and amber colored glass panels; while a few were made with richly hued cobalt-blue glass. Franks noted that most are signal or switch-type lanterns made by Dietz or other manufacturers. Each is marked with the name of an American railroad.

 

Additionally, there are some very scarce inspectors lanterns with matching IDs on the casing and globe components, and one particularly rare presentation lantern. The grouping also includes many as eight brass firemen’s lanterns, which have a distinctive shape and large, rolled handles that prevented the user’s hands from getting burned.

 

“The lanterns will be accessible to every level of collector,” said Franks. “Their book values range from $50 to $700 apiece.”

 

Selection of blue and white historical-pattern china used in dining cars on the B&O (Baltimore & Ohio) line. A&S image.

Franks predicts crossover competition from antique advertising collectors for the scores of old railroad signs in the Gay collection. Highlights include a beautiful, all-original circa 1890-1930 MKT porcelain sign, conservatively estimated at $2,000-$3,000; and a 36-inch-diameter “buzzsaw” sign, referring to its serrated edges, which advertises Texas Pacific Lines on one side and Missouri Pacific on the other. Franks explained that the sign would be flipped over when a train crossed a state line where one or the other of the companies had jurisdiction.

 

A vast array of railroad tableware incorporates 200-300 pieces of marked china, including a rare dinner plate for the Great Northern Iron Mountain Route’s Sunshine Special, estimate $2,000-$3,000. Other railroad china comes from Missouri Pacific (including service plates), Texas Pacific, MKT, NY Central, Union Pacific and Southern Pacific. Additionally, there is a large assortment of blue china in B&O’s historical pattern.

 

Other food service goods include silver flatware and covered wares marked for dining cars or railroad companies; table linens, 65 railroad-marked sugar tongs, 2-cup pitchers for tea or coffee, creamers, sugar bowls, covered bowls, carafes, pedestaled dessert dishes, and salt and pepper sets.

 

The late Roy Gay prized this beautiful plate from the Great Northern Railroad’s Sunshine Special above all other china in his vast collection. A&S image.

Every train had a galley where beverages and other liquids were stored in crocks. One- and 2-gallon examples marked with railroad names are part of the Gay collection, as are more than 100 crocks marked for brands of whiskey and other alcoholic beverages; saloons and taverns.

 

“Right now, whiskey crocks are one of the hottest tickets in the auction market,” said Franks. “Mr. Gay’s crocks are marked with the name of a person or company, and also, in many cases, the location where the whiskey was distilled. They represent old-time whiskey companies from Texas all the way up to New York. We think collectors are going to really get excited when they see this selection.”

 

Decks of cards in the Roy Gay collection include this rare pack advertising the St. Louis Southwestern Railway’s Cotton Belt Route. A&S image.

Many items kept train passengers occupied on long journeys of a century ago, and nearly all were marked with the names of particular railroads. Among the convenience articles to be auctioned are ashtrays, playing cards (some with an African-American theme), dozens of paper hand fans with advertising, blankets and numerous cast-iron footstools that ladies and children would step onto when boarding a train.

 

Manly metal from the steam-train era will be front and center on auction day, with such contents as railroad-branded locomotive engine bells, spittoons, and brass railroad locks and keys; plus an extremely rare cast-iron stove made by Hart Mfg. of Louisville, Ky., and embossed with the word “Caboose.” Auctioneer Franks, who has handled numerous railroad items over the years, said it is the first of its type he has ever seen.

 

The ‘heavy metal’ section of the sale includes steam locomotive engine bells (as shown), spittoons, brass railroad locks and keys; plus an extremely rare cast-iron caboose stove. A&S image.

Framed decorative artworks from train stations of a bygone era are led by a spectacular panoramic, shadowboxed wildlife photo titled “An Elk Lodge in the Jackson Hole Country Reached via the Union Pacific System.” Measuring 48 inches wide by 12 inches high, the circa-1920s picture was taken on the Steven N. Leek resort lodge and ranch, an elk refuge in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. Leek’s Lodge, which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was destroyed by fire in 1998.

 

The auction offering contains many other desirable railroad mementos, such as caps from conductors, inspectors and engineers; railroad passes, railroad station thermometers that advertise train lines and various products, and 75-80 pieces of railroad-marked tinware for use with diesel cans and other containers.

 

Roy Gay’s 1929 emerald green Model A with camel upholstery and rumble seat. A&S image.

In addition to railroad antiques, the Roy Gay collection includes an extensive selection of early automobilia, 30 to 35 gas pump globes, an 8ft. Mobil Pegasus sign and other advertising; and even a beautiful emerald green 1929 Model A rumble-seat Ford. The car has always been garaged and is drivable.

 

The March 10-11 auction will be held live at A&S Antique Auctions’ gallery, 900 E. Loop 340, Waco, TX 76716, and will start at 10 a.m. Central Time each day. All forms of remote bidding will be available, including absentee, by phone or live via the Internet through LiveAuctioneers.com. For additional information call 254-799-6044 or e-mail asantiques@yahoo.com. Visit the A&S website at www.asauctions.com. View the online catalog at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Sotheby’s London – The Collection of Giovanni and Gabriella Barilla

January 27th, 2012 by

From their Geneva residence, the collection of Giovanni and Gabriella Barilla, descendants of the famous dynasty of pasta makers, encompasses pieces for both the passionate and composed collector. Among one of the most important European collections of German and Italian porcelain, early Meissen by Böttger, Baroque commedia dell’arte figures by Kändler, and rare models and harlequins from the Wiessenfels group, mix happily with exceptional and very rare Capodimonte pieces, Buen Retiro, Vezzi and Fabrica Ferdinandea, Napoli groups and figures – altogether encapsulating the vibrance of ‘carnival’. Together with colourful Maiolica, Faenza and Della Robbia, these compliment and enrich the collection of elegant 18th century Venetian furniture and paintings, drawings, silver, works of art, books and 15th century manuscripts.

 

Sotheby’s New York – American Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture

January 27th, 2012 by

Sotheby’s is now accepting consignments through February 5th for the American Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture sale, to be held on April 5th, 2012.

 

Swann Galleries – African American Fine Art

January 26th, 2012 by
February 16, 2012
Features the first William T. Williams painting to appear at auction, a monumental 1971 acrylic on canvas titled Eastern Star.

 

USATheatres.com – American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show

January 20th, 2012 by

Serious toys on tap for serious collectors Dealers flowing into March 3 toy, coin-op show

January 16th, 2012 by

Hershey, Pa – USA Theatres, promoters of the upcoming American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show, recently revealed some of the quality dealers who will be exhibiting at the inaugural show.

Tom Miano, owner of Serious Toyz, will be occupying 24 feet of exhibit space, offering a fine variety of vintage toys and collectibles; while Fred Franklin, owner of Rec Room Specialties, will be showing off a great selection of antique slot machines, game machines and other coin-operated related items.

The American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show will feature quality exhibitors buying, selling and trading an array of antique and collectible toys, such as character toys, tin toys, mechanical toys, banks, advertising items and coin-ops, according to the promoters.

The show is set to debut on Saturday, March 3 at the Eastern Civic Center, located at 90 Harding Road in Old Greenwich, Connecticut.

“The location at the Greenwich Civic Center is a highly strategic choice,” said Ronald M. Vastola, Outreach Coordinator of USA Theatres.  The site is conveniently located to most major metropolitan areas in the Northeast, and can easily attract collectors from Maryland, Washington DC, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and of course, the New England states.

“It’s only a 40 minute, $8 ride from Grand Central Terminal in New York City,” Vastola said.  “The Eastern Civic Center in Old Greenwich is situated within walking distance from the Metro-North Train Station.”

Other exhibitors on tap include Mike Milo and Lauren Czajkowski, co-owners of Milo Toys & Collectables; and Ken Laurence, owner of Heroes Unlimited and show promoter of the Super Megashow held in New Jersey and the Boston Super Megafest.

Additional exhibitors from New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, who specialize in jukeboxes, soda machines and gumball machines, have responded to the show; including Dan Morphy, owner of Morphy Auctions, who is interested in utilizing 24 feet of exhibit space.

Anyone planning on attending the show can expect to pay $10 for general admission on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  For the serious collector, early buyers are welcome Friday evening at 6:00 p.m. and also Saturday morning at 7:00 a.m. for $20 per person each day.  Children under 12 will be admitted for free, accompanied by a paying adult.

A variety of food and beverages will be available for purchase, provided by Joemomma Foods, Incorporated of Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Exhibitor space is still currently available; however, exhibitors are encouraged to sign-up soon as spaces are limited.

“It’s going to be a brisk and fantastic show,” Vastola added.

For more information, call (717) 542-0567 or email usatheatres@yahoo.com

You may also visit the website, www.usatheatres.com/conventions

 

For hotel accommodations, you may contact the Hilton Stamford Hotel & Executive Meeting Center, the official hotel of the American Antique Toy & Coin-Op Show.

The Hilton is located at 1 First Stamford Place in Stamford, Connecticut, just 1.4 miles, 4 minutes from the Eastern Civic Center.

Mention the show to receive a special room rate of just $79 per night (promo code: AMA).

You may call the hotel directly at (203) 967-2222 or visit their website, www.hiltonstamfordhotel.com

 

Clark’s Fine Art to auction important modern and contemporary artworks with Hollywood connection on Jan. 21

January 11th, 2012 by

Monique Frydman (American, b. 1943-), ‘Jaune Majeur III,’ 1988, 86 x 76 inches. Provenance: Galerie Baudoin Lebon, Paris. Est. $12,000-$18,000. Clark’s Fine Art image.

SHERMAN OAKS, Calif. – On Saturday, Jan. 21, Clark’s Fine Art of Sherman Oaks (Los Angeles), Calif., will conduct its first auction of 2012 – a 270-lot auction of premier modern and contemporary artworks from three significant collections, plus additional select consignments. Two of the featured collections are from the estates of Hollywood luminaries who played key roles in the production of TV and film classics known the world over. The third collection consists of contemporary works of art donated by supporters to the Silverlake Independent Jewish Community Center, a Los Angeles nonprofit that will benefit from its portion of the auction proceeds.

 

One of the sale’s key collections was amassed by Harold Berkowitz, a prominent entertainment lawyer whose A-list clients included Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters, Jack Lemmon and even the canine superstar Rin Tin Tin. Maintaining offices in Beverly Hills and Paris to accommodate his international clientele, Berkowitz had a hand in the deals behind the Pink Panther movie series and 1975 horror-thriller Jaws, as well as many of television’s most enduring shows, including Lassie, Flipper, The Donna Reed Show and All in the Family.

 

Alex Brown (American, b. 1966-), ‘Presence Chamber,’ 1998, 68 x 60 inches. Est. $6,000-$9,000. Clark’s Fine Art image.

“Mr. Berkowitz, who passed away in 2010, lived in Malibu and collected contemporary and modern art that suited the décor of his home. His refined taste is reflected in the artworks he personally chose for his collection,” said Clark Cierlak, owner of Clark’s Fine Art.

 

The second major art collection in the sale comes from the estate of Hollywood director Jerrold “Jerry” Bernstein (1930-1979), whose TV credits included The Flying Nun, Gidget, Nanny and the Professor, I Dream of Jeannie, and scores of other popular shows.

 

“Like Mr. Berkowitz, Jerry Bernstein favored contemporary and modern art. He also liked and, to a lesser extent, collected African art. His art collection has remained in the family for the past 32 years. We are honored to be presenting it at auction,” said Cierlak.

 

The contemporary art collection consigned by the Silverlake Independent Jewish Community Center blends perfectly into the trifecta of auction headliners. It is comprised of quality contemporary artworks that were gifts from generous supporters.

 

Alfio Castelli (Italian, b. 1917-), ‘Colloquio,’ cast bronze sculpture, 1962, 60 x 40 x 48 inches. Provenance: David E. Bright collection. Est. $20,000-$40,000. Clark’s Fine Art image.

“The Silverlake center has been a respected institution within the Los Angeles Jewish community for more than 60 years and provides early childhood education and social programs for people of all backgrounds who have an interest in Jewish culture,” said Cierlak. “Over the years some very nice artworks have been donated to the center. There are paintings with previous appraisal values of $30,000 to $40,000 that we will auction with estimates of $4,000 to $5,000 each.”

 

One of the sale’s top highlights is a 1988 Monique Frydman (American, b. 1943-) pigment, color pastel and oil painting on canvas titled Jaune Majeur III. The 86 x 76 inch work is artist-signed and dated on verso, and comes with provenance from Galerie Baudoin Lebon in Paris. It is estimated at $12,000-$18,000.

 

Another fine American work is Alex Brown’s (b. 1966-) oil on canvas titled Presence Chamber. The 68 x 60 inch painting – titled, signed and dated “1998” on verso – renders a three-dimensional op art effect. With an appraised value of $37,000, it is cataloged with a $6,000-$9,000 estimate.

 

Gene Logan (Californian, 1922-1999), ‘Standing Nude Woman,’ welded metal sculpture, 70 inches tall inclusive of hydra-stone base. Est. 1,000-$2,000. Clark’s Fine Art image.

A wonderful cast-bronze sculpture titled Colloquio was created in 1962 by Italian sculptor Alfio Castelli (b. 1917-). The signed 60 x 40 x 48 inch depiction of two angular figures in a perpendicular arrangement was previously in the collection of the late David E. Bright and is estimated at $20,000-$40,000. Cierlak noted that David Bright was “a renowned collector who bequeathed 23 paintings to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where a wing was named after him. There are also 11 works from his estate at the Murphy Sculpture Garden at UCLA.”

 

Standing Nude Woman, a 70-inch-tall welded metal sculpture by Californian Gene Logan (1922-1999), comes with provenance from the Ankrum Gallery, which opened in 1960 and for decades was a favorite haunt for art collectors in LA. Estimate: $1,000-$2,000.

 

Alida Margolis (American, b. 1975) created the oval oil on canvas titled We Love You All. Signed and dated on verso, the 64½ x 106 inch painting has an appraised value of $20,000. It will be offered at Clark’s on Jan. 21 with an $8,000-$12,000 estimate.

 

Norwegian artist Haavard Homstvedt’s (b. 1976-) acrylic-on-linen wrapped over panel work titled Nudes (Double Step) measures 64 x 48 inches and was previously appraised at $35,000. Some sharp-eyed collector could take away a bargain if it sells within its estimate range of $4,000-$6,000.

 

Alida Margolis (American, b. 1975), ‘We Love You All,’ 64 ½ x 106 inches. Est. $8,000-$12,000. Clark’s Fine Art image.

Two signed multicolor acrylic columns by Yugoslavian artist Velizar Vasa (b. 1933-) will be offered individually in consecutive lots. Each incorporates a spectrum of colors – blue, green, yellow and purple – and measures 101 inches tall, inclusive of stand. The presale estimate on each column is $4,000-$6,000.

 

Clark’s Fine Art welcomes all forms of bidding for its Jan. 21 auction, including live at the gallery, absentee, by phone, or live via the Internet through LiveAuctioneers.com. The gallery is located at 14931 Califa St., Space A, Sherman Oaks (Los Angeles), CA 91411. The auction will begin at noon Pacific Time. Preview 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 16 through Friday, Jan. 20, and from 10 a.m. till noon on auction day.

 

For additional information on any lot in the sale, call 818-783-3052 or e-mail gallery@pacbell.net. View the fully illustrated catalog online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com. Visit Clark’s website at www.estateauctionservice.com.

 

 

Morphy’s Feb. 9-11 auction starts the company’s New Year with toys, trains, advertising, superhero comics

January 11th, 2012 by

1900 Coca-Cola serving tray featuring the soft drink company’s first model, Hilda Clark; 9½ in. diameter. Est. $2,000-$3,500. Morphy Auctions image.

DENVER, Pa. – More than 2,000 lots of antique toys, trains, advertising and rare comics are primed and ready to make their appearance Feb. 9-11 in Morphy Auctions’ first sale of 2012. All forms of bidding will be available, including live via the Internet, with start times set for 10 a.m. on Thursday and Friday, and 9 a.m. for the Saturday session.

 

The fun begins with 350+ lots of Coca-Cola and other soda pop advertising. Highlights include a 1929 Orange Crush calendar with full pad, est. $700-$1,200; a 1900 Coca-Cola serving tray, $3,000-$4,000; and a complete set of 10 original Coca-Cola advertising pocket mirrors from the years 1906-1916. The set is expected to fetch $1,800-$2,500.

 

Following the soda pop section, there will be 150 general advertising lots, including an Ingraham Hills Liver Ticker reverse-on-glass clock with the image of a pretty girl, $3,000-$4,000; and a small grouping of dye cabinets, including examples promoting Peerless Dyes and Diamond Dyes.

 

Plaster Penfold smoking golfer advertising figure, 1930s. Est. $800-$1,200. Morphy Auctions image.

After a very successful initial outing in December at Morphy’s, part two of an advanced collection of advertising figures will cross the auction block, together with additional consignments of comparable quality. In all, there are approximately 100 lots of figures produced from the 1920s to 1950s.

 

“There’s a tremendous variety,” said Morphy Auctions associate Mike Karberg. “Any product you can imagine is included, from alcoholic beverages and sporting goods to clothing, food and consumer goods.”

 

Highlights include an extremely rare Mr. All-American Hot Dog figure advertising Jordan’s Franks, estimate: $1,000-$2,000. Also in the collection are four figural advertising pieces featuring Esquire magazine’s dapper mascot, Esky. From a different consignor comes a 1940s composition advertising figure depicting the “Kelvinator (Refrigerators) Lady.” Estimate: $800-$1,200.

 

The Friday session includes 50+ pressed-steel toys (e.g., Keystone, Buddy ‘L’) and 150 tin wind-up and battery-operated toys, with many key items from Marx and Linemar. A clean Buck Rogers Rocket Fighter in its original box, a Schuco teddy bear on scooter and a desirable boxed Batman battery op are among the top lots. A single-owner collection of approximately 80 Howdy Doody toys will be offered, as well.

 

1966 battery-operated walking Batman toy, tin with vinyl head and original cloth cape, original box. Est. $4,000-$8,000. Morphy Auctions image.

More than 150 European wind-up toy lots span automotive, nautical and other categories. Around 50 colorful penny toys, mostly Continental in origin, are in excellent condition and come from a long-held collection. There are numerous autos, motorcycles and specialty figurals, such as an articulated sailboat and soccer players. An additional European lot in this section is a large “Holland” biscuit tin ship.

 

Among the 200 character lots are 50+ vintage wristwatches, many in their original boxes. Characters represented include Mickey Mouse, the Lone Ranger, Davy Crockett and Donald Duck. A Howdy Doody wristwatch store display is a standout in this category.

 

The Saturday session begins with 50+ figural cast iron lots, including bottle openers, doorknockers and paperweights. Cast-iron mechanical banks are led by a Perfection Registering bank that Morphy’s CEO Dan Morphy says is “one of the nicest examples [he’s] ever seen.” Estimate: $25,000-$35,000. Other mechanicals include a Mammy with Spoon (blue dress version) and a near-mint Santa at the Chimney.

 

Cast-iron Perfection Registering mechanical bank, all original and in working order. Est. $20,000-$30,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Over 100 cast-iron toy lots will cross the auction block, with a large assortment of motorcycles, trucks and cars by Hubley, Arcade and Kenton.

 

A wonderful selection of more than 200 toy train lots awaits bidders, with many pieces coming from the Estate of Kenneth J. Rohrbaugh. “The trains in the Rohrbaugh grouping had been on loan to the Lincoln Train Museum in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania,” explained Morphy’s Chief Operating Officer Tom Sage Jr.

 

The predicted top lot in the train section is an outstanding Lionel Mickey Mouse Circus Train set, complete with its original box and cardboard inserts. Additionally, there are many excellent prewar Lionel 0 gauge passenger sets with original boxes, an American Flyer standard gauge stadium set in original set box, and a number of more contemporary trains, including productions from MPC and MTH (Mike’s Train House.)

 

“There’s a good mix of trains,” said Sage, “including a standard gauge white Ives 3243 set, an American Flyer President’s Special set, Marklin and other European trains.”

 

‘The Amazing Spider-Man’ No. 1 comic book, 1963, CGC-graded 8.5 with off-white pages. Est. $25,000-$30,000. Morphy Auctions image.

With the expert oversight of Brian Schutzer and Pittsburgh’s legendary Sparkle City Comics, Morphy’s will launch its new Comic Books division during the third session of the Feb. 9-11 event. More than 250 prized comics from an original-owner collection will be offered, including a 1963 The Amazing Spider-Man No. 1, CGC-graded in 8.5 condition, which is expected to realize $25,000-$30,000. Other anticipated top lots include a 1963 X-Men No. 1 and a 1963 Tales of Suspense No. 39 featuring the first appearance of Iron Man.

 

All forms of bidding will be available for Morphy’s Feb. 9-11, 2012 auction, including live at the gallery, phone, absentee, and live via the Internet through Morphy Live or LiveAuctioneers.com. The auction will commence at 10 a.m. Eastern Time on Thursday, Feb. 9 and Friday, Feb. 10; and at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11. For additional information, call 717-335-3435 or email serena@morphyauctions.com. View the fully illustrated catalog online at www.morphyauctions.com.

Tonya A. Cameron to auction Asian art, antiques and historical ephemera from estate of Boston theater critic Dr. Caldwell Titcomb

December 30th, 2011 by

Brandeis professor emeritus was noted African-American history scholar

 

Giant in Tower mechanical bank, 1902, John Harper Ltd., from a collection of cast-iron banks to be auctioned in the opening session. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

SAUGUS, Mass. – Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers will present selections from the estate of theater critic, university professor and African-American history scholar Dr. Caldwell Titcomb in a Thursday, Jan. 12 evening auction at the company’s suburban Boston gallery. Internet live bidding will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

The 350-lot sale, which will be divided into two consecutive sessions, includes important archival documents and other ephemera from Dr. Titcomb’s historical research, as well as Asian art and bronzes; furniture and several paintings. Additional private consignments from New England residences include collections of antique mechanical banks and toys; 19th-century rifles, fine diamond jewelry and American sterling silver.

 

“There’s more than enough in this sale to keep people interested and on their seats, but we also enjoy playing host to our guests, so there will be a complimentary hors d’oeuvres smorgasbord and beverages available for all who attend,” said Tonya Cameron.

 

Session I, starting at 5 p.m., features a single-owner collection of approximately 20 cast-iron mechanical banks of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Among them are an Eagle and Eaglets, Humpty Dumpty, Trick Dog, Teddy (Roosevelt) and the Bear, full-figure Uncle Sam, Artillery, and Uncle Remus. A coveted English production known as the Giant in Tower bank was made in 1902 by John Harper Ltd.

 

The bank collector also amassed a number of amusing battery-operated toys from the 1950s and ’60s. The grouping includes Shoeshine Bear, Mambo Elephant, Drinking Monkey, Clown Playing Xylophone, and Sneezing Bear. A Bubble Blowing Monkey is similar in design to the battery ops but functions via an electrical plug. The opening session also contains a few boxed space-theme and wind-up toys.

 

File copy of Dr. Caldwell Titcomb’s 1966 letter to Amherst College inquiring about the dates during which “famous Negro abolitionist Robert Purvis” may have been a student there. Archive of Dr. Caldwell Titcomb. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

At approximately 6:15 p.m., the 300-lot session featuring Dr. Titcomb’s estate items will commence. Tonya Cameron said she is honored that her company was chosen to auction the late professor’s collections.

 

“Dr. Titcomb was an intellectual fixture in Boston’s theater scene. He had been a professor at Brandeis University, was a longtime theater critic and a passionate musician and composer. On top of that, he was deeply interested in African-American history and left an extraordinary archive of letters – some historical and some his own – and other ephemera documenting decades of study in that field,” Cameron said.

 

A file copy of an Aug. 6, 1966 letter from the Titcomb archive attests to the late professor’s fastidious attention to detail. In that letter to Amherst College’s Alumni Records Department, Titcomb informs that he is researching “early Negro college students” and wishes to clarify a possible historical discrepancy. He asks if Amherst’s records can confirm whether or not “the famous Negro abolitionist Robert Purvis” attended, but did not graduate from, Amherst College prior to 1826. In his letter, Titcomb explains that he wishes to confirm a published statement he had seen regarding Purvis’ matriculation at Amherst, noting that the timeframe stated seemed “odd, since Purvis was not born until 1810.”

 

The ephemera highlights also include a typed manuscript for a play Titcomb wrote, and five personally assembled scrap albums of obituaries, biographies and other materials pertaining to theatrical luminaries from around the world. “It’s a remarkable time capsule,” Cameron observed.

 

Pair of large, bronze foo dogs, Estate of Dr. Caldwell Titcomb. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

Dr. Titcomb embraced many cultures and traveled extensively across Asia, acquiring 18th, 19th and 20th century antiques. The auction selection includes many bronzes in the $500-$1,000 range and several in the $200-$500 range. The top lot of this category is a pair of large bronze foo dogs estimated at $2,000-$3,000.

 

Ceramics include Imari and Moriagi productions and a beautiful Kutani porcelain vase in an orange and blue colorway. Carved hardstone figurals will be offered in group lots.

 

Louise Davies Webber abstract watercolor painting. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

Also coming from the Titcomb estate are abstract paintings by Maine landscape and still life artist Louise Davies Webber, a Chinese sword with decorated handle and scabbard; and an Indian sword with figural hilt.

 

Private consignments yielded an extensive Reed & Barton 24-place-setting sterling silver flatware set in the Burgundy pattern. While a few of the settings lack their salad forks, the silver suite includes desirable butter pats and knives; and many unusual serving pieces such as a stuffing spoon and large meat fork. The set is housed in a mahogany chest and carries a presale estimate of $4,000-$5,000.

 

Gorham 6-piece coffee, tea and water kettle set with tray, 1950s. Est. $4,000-$4,500. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

Another silver highlight is a Gorham 6-piece coffee, tea and water kettle set. The midcentury service, complete with tray, is expected to make $4,000-$4,500.

 

Firearms are led by a G. Hyslop antique flintlock Kentucky long gun and Thompson/Center 50 caliber flintlock. Other collectible weapons include an 1880s-era Turkish flintlock pistol and an Allen Thurber & Co. pocket pistol with an 1845 patent. Civil War books and etchings complete the section.

 

(Top) 1880s-era Turkish flintlock pistol and (bottom) Allen Thurber & Co. pocket pistol with an 1845 patent. Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers image.

The auction’s broad variety of goods also includes 18th century Spanish Colonial paintings, Abe Blashko drawings, bronzes by listed artists, a fine campaign chest on pedestal, five vintage Brunswick ivory-tipped pool cues with pearl and ivory inlay; and gold and diamond estate jewelry.

 

Tonya A. Cameron’s auction featuring selections from the estate of Dr. Caldwell Titcomb will take place on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2012, at the company’s gallery at 113 Bennett Highway, Saugus, MA 01906, commencing at 5 p.m. Eastern time. Preview: Jan. 11 from 12-5 and Jan. 12 from 12-4:45.

 

All forms of bidding will be available, including telephone, absentee and online through LiveAuctioneers.com. For additional information, call 781-233-0006 or e-mail tac602@gmail.com. Visit Tonya A. Cameron Auctioneers online at www.tacauctioneers.com.